superior fibular retinaculum

(redirected from superior peroneal retinaculum)

superior fibular retinaculum

[TA]
upper thickened band of deep fascia overlying the fibularis longus and brevis tendons as they pass posterior to the fibular malleolus, anchoring the tendons and their associated bursa in place; it extends from the lateral malleolus to to the calcaneus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Forces that can influence talocalcaneal joint are calcaneofibular ligament, the superior peroneal retinaculum (calcaneal fibular retinaculum), the peroneal tendon sheaths, and the posterior talocalcaneal ligament.
Thus a rupture of the superior peroneal retinaculum can be considered as a annular ligament or pulley lesion.
Dor-sal of this groove both peroneal tendons run distally and are covered by the superior peroneal retinaculum which holds the tendons in place to reduce tendon excursions and prevent the tendons to dislocate [5].
A rupture of the superior peroneal retinaculum causes the tendons to dislocate out of the anatomical retrofibular groove over the fibrocartilagenous cushion ventrally.
1) The superior peroneal retinaculum is essential to maintaining the tendons behind the fibula.
36,37) This mechanism can disrupt the superior peroneal retinaculum, leading to recurrent subluxation or dislocation and subsequent ankle instability.
Other anatomical abnormalities that can predispose a patient to peroneal tendon tears include an abnormal superior peroneal retinaculum attachment (which can lead to recurrent subluxation or dislocation), a mass causing compression along the course of the tendons, and anomalous muscles (such as a peroneus quartus).
MRI features of chronic injuries of the superior peroneal retinaculum.
We describe a technique for the reconstruction of the superior peroneal retinaculum using anchors.
1) The primary restraint to tendon subluxation is the superior peroneal retinaculum.
65) Sobel investigated disruption of the superior peroneal retinaculum, which restrains the peroneal tendons in their groove behind the ankle.
Geppert also noted that lateral ankle instability was associated with several peroneal pathologies, including superior peroneal retinaculum laxity, subluxing peroneal tendons, and splits of the peroneus brevis tendon.
Full browser ?