superimposed preeclampsia


Also found in: Acronyms.

su·per·im·posed pre·e·clamp·si·a

the development of preeclampsia in a patient with chronic hypertensive vascular or renal disease; when the hypertension antedates the pregnancy as established by previous blood pressure recordings, a rise in the systolic pressure of 30 mmHg or a rise in the diastolic pressure of 15 mmHg and the development of proteinuria or edema, or both, are required during pregnancy to establish the diagnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overdiagnosis "may be preferable," the report says, given the high risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes with superimposed preeclampsia. On the other hand, it says, a "more stratified approach based on severity and predictors of adverse outcome may be useful" in avoiding unnecessary preterm births.
(4) (Such testing is important, given that newonset or worsening proteinuria is a manifestation of superimposed preeclampsia.) All pregnant patients with chronic hypertension also should have a complete blood count, including a platelet count, and an early screen for gestational diabetes.
She was diagnosed with chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia due to the presence of proteinuria, which is not commonly associated with pheochromocytoma or PGL [5, 6].
Thus, the main objective of this pilot study was to test the hypothesis that the administration of a combination of low-dose aspirin and calcium would reduce the risk of superimposed preeclampsia in women at high risk for this condition due to chronic hypertension and abnormal uterine artery Doppler in the second trimester.
Superimposed preeclampsia was defined as preeclampsia complicating chronic hypertension, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) criteria.
Protein excretion was [greater than or equal to]300 mg/24-h in 282 patients (30.4%); among these, 23 had chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia and 259 had primary preeclampsia.
Discontinue diuretics if there's any evidence of superimposed preeclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction.
On completion of 34 weeks, she was posted for elective LSCS in view of superimposed preeclampsia and breech presentation of both twins.
Hypertensive disorders included mild, severe, or superimposed preeclampsia, eclampsia, and gestational hypertension diagnosed in the antepartum period.
* chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia: 34 or 37 weeks, depending on the presence of severe features.
Young and nulliparous women are particularly vulnerable to developing preeclampsia, whereas older women are at greater risk for chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The incidence is markedly influenced by race and ethnicity and thus by genetic predisposition.
Gestational hypertension and chronic hypertension do sometimes coexist with superimposed preeclampsia, but should not be confused with preeclampsia or lead to management decisions that should apply only to patients with preeclampsia.