superficial vein


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Related to superficial vein: Deep vein

su·per·fi·cial vein

[TA]
one of a number of veins that course in the subcutaneous tissue and empty into deep veins; they form prominent systems of vessels in the limbs and are usually not accompanied by arteries.

superficial vein

one of the many veins between the subcutaneous fascia just under the skin. Compare deep vein.

su·per·fi·cial vein

(sū'pĕr-fish'ăl vān) [TA]
One of several veins that course in the subcutaneous tissue and empty into deep veins; they form prominent systems of vessels in the limbs and are usually not accompanied by arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the study, Dr Barbara Binder, of the Medical University of Graz, Austria, and colleagues studied 46 consecutive patients (32 women and 14 men) with superficial vein thrombosis between November 2006 and June 2007.
Superficial veins are those that are close to the skin.
The distribution of these often follows the course of the affected superficial veins with dilatation of their branches, and palpation may reveal tenderness.
For example, neurologic problems should suggest HAX1 mutation and presence of superficial veins on the skin, cardiac and urogenital anomalies should suggest G6PC3 mutation.
Superficial veins (the greater and shorter saphenous veins and their branches) lie outside this supportive fascia and communicate with the deep veins via perforator veins.
Valves in the vein close like gates if blood tries to run in the wrong direction, but if these valves fail to work properly, blood is forced to flow back down the leg causing superficial veins under the skin to bulge.
There are two sets of veins in the legs, the superficial veins that lie under the skin and the deep veins that lie in the muscle itself.
Patients often present with pain and swelling after strenuous activity, a cyanotic arm, dilated superficial veins, and tenderness to palpation over the deltopectoral groove.
These new methods of resolving venous hypertension in the superficial veins of the lower extremities are safe and offer better patient outcomes with significantly less patient inconvenience than prior surgical remedies.
Blood is forced to flow back down the leg, which causes superficial veins under the skin to bulge.
Venipuncture-induced causalgia: anatomic relations of upper extremity superficial veins and nerves, and clinical considerations.

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