superego

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superego

 [soo″per-e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, a part of the psyche derived from both the id and the ego, which acts, largely unconsciously, as a monitor over the ego. It is that part of the personality concerned with social standards, ethics, and conscience. Early in life the superego is formed by the infant's identification with parents and other significant and esteemed persons in his or her life. The real or supposed expectations of these persons gradually are accepted as general rules of society and help form the “conscience.” The superego tends to be self-critical and in psychotic and anxious persons strong feelings of guilt and unworthiness can lead to self-punitive measures in an effort to resolve conflicts between the id, ego, and superego.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō),
In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

/su·per·ego/ (soo″per-e´go) in psychoanalysis, the aspect of the personality that acts as a monitor and evaluator of ego functioning, comparing it with an ideal standard.

superego

(so͞o′pər-ē′gō)
n. pl. supere·gos
In Freudian theory, the division of the unconscious that is formed through the internalization of moral standards of parents and society, and that censors and restrains the ego.

superego

[ē′gō]
Etymology: L, super, over; ego, I
(in psychoanalysis) that part of the psyche, functioning mostly in the unconscious, that develops when the standards of the parents and of society are incorporated into the ego. The superego has two parts, the conscience and the ego ideal. Also called the structure of the psyche that is governed by one's moral code. See also ego, ego ideal, id.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

A psychoanalytic term for the conscience. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
This answer implies that the child possesses an evaluative faculty that is independent of the received values preserved in his superego.
What now begins to emerge is that the superego is not a final or ultimate authority in the Freudian psyche.
The secondary position of the superego in the order of normative authority raises a question about Freud's account of morality.
The Freudian superego lacks ultimate authority, then, because it reflects the child's infatuation with his parents, which is superseded in maturity by evaluative reasoning undertaken by the ego under norms of rationality.
So perhaps the superego really can be the Categorical Imperative.
Freud also identified the superego with the Kantian "moral law within us" (New Introductory Lectures, S.
22:78 [97], where the superego is said to punish the ego with "tense feelings of inferiority and of guilt.
The superego could nevertheless torment the ego by exacerbating its misdirected fear, like a mugger brandishing a toy knife.
In their terminology, the location of fear with respect to ego and superego would be a matter of structure, not topography.
28) As I shall explain below, Freud first hypothesized that the ego gave itself an ideal to receive the narcissistic love that it could no longer invest in itself, in light of parental criticism; but he later traced the ego ideal to the parents, on the hypothesis that the superego contained precipitates of them not only as objects of fear but also as objects of admiration.