superego


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superego

 [soo″per-e´go]
in psychoanalytic theory, a part of the psyche derived from both the id and the ego, which acts, largely unconsciously, as a monitor over the ego. It is that part of the personality concerned with social standards, ethics, and conscience. Early in life the superego is formed by the infant's identification with parents and other significant and esteemed persons in his or her life. The real or supposed expectations of these persons gradually are accepted as general rules of society and help form the “conscience.” The superego tends to be self-critical and in psychotic and anxious persons strong feelings of guilt and unworthiness can lead to self-punitive measures in an effort to resolve conflicts between the id, ego, and superego.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō),
In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

(so͞o′pər-ē′gō)
n. pl. supere·gos
In Freudian theory, the division of the unconscious that is formed through the internalization of moral standards of parents and society, and that censors and restrains the ego.

su·per·e·go

(sū'pĕr-ē'gō)
psychoanalysis One of the three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and the id. It is an outgrowth of the ego that has identified itself unconsciously with important people, such as parents, from early life, and results from incorporating the values and wishes of these people and subsequently societal norms as part of one's own standards to form the "conscience."

superego

A psychoanalytic term for the conscience. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ora, essa condicao de superego nao foi conquistada instantaneamente, mas e fruto de uma construcao institucional que se iniciou no periodo de constitution-building pre 1988 e encontra-se, ainda, em progresso.
Both the Interaction Order and superego (as the personification of the Interaction Order) precede the individual, as one is always socialized into an already existing world not of one's own choosing.
According to the New Introductory Lectures, the superego develops primarily through identification; through the desire to be like someone else.
This internal object is also the basis of the pervert's archaic superego. This object, represented in L's dreams as an engulfing circle and an evil woman thrashing a helpless puppy-self, seemed to be made up of a set of frightening, hurtful and enraging experiences with her mother, and subsequently her female siblings.
One could easily view her repressed infatuation with Caledu as a masochistic fantasy of submission before her dominating superego; in this case, Caledu would be a figure for the father's original brutality and prohibition.
Here we have the best register for Treadwell's "kind warrior," who is suspended not just between Samurai and parent, or between father and mother, but also between male and female--more than once Treadwell adverts to his sexually uncertain status, describing himself at one point as "passive" and a "patsy." On all these registers, Treadwell's perversity is grounded in the animals he fights and fights to protect, since they hold down that "Law of Nature" and, in it, the sadistic superego with which he is identified.
Following this Lacanian scheme relative to the superego, Maria Aristodemou suggests, "once the subject accedes to language and enters the symbolic order, her shortcomings in relation to enjoyment are exploited by the superego which is unsatisfiable: as far as the superego is concerned, we can never enjoy enough." (74) Like Miller queuing first to disembark and then have his passport and visa checked, all the time in sight of the train ready to take him and the other passengers to London, we are all in a state of anticipation concerning our relationship with enjoyment.
The betrayal of one's desire (of not having 'acted in conformity with the desire that is in you', impervious to the prescriptions instilled in us by ideology) binds us more strongly to the Law, and that concomitantly provokes in us unappeasable guilty feelings which are dispensed by an agency Lacan calls "superego" (1992: 314).
The explanation for this apparent lack of logic is not to be found in Freud, but in Lacan's radical redefinition of the agency of the superego. When what Lacan called the-Name-of-the-Father (the set of internalised social regulations and restrictions) is suspended, the subject's access to enjoyment is blocked.
Carel points out that Freud's realism defines human happiness as a lessening of suffering: the instinctual origin of the death drive makes it part of the id, war arises as a result of the death drive, repetition is a manifestation of the death drive (the repetition of the death drive is entropic), the superego is an internalized death drive, resulting in guilt and self-persecution, while serving as the source of ethics, and the absence of death from the unconscious is not a problem for the death drive.
Contemporary capitalism, as a form of generalised perversion, is said to be a society of commanded enjoyment, a post-Oedipal order ruled over by a perverse imperative to consume incessantly, where prohibition is replaced by an apparent permissiveness that actually masks superego prescription.
Itten, Filler writes, was "the id to the superego" of arehiteet Walter Gropius, the sehoors first director.