sunscreen


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sunscreen

 [sun´skrēn]
a lotion applied to the skin as protection against sunburn and the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. Sunscreens are labeled with a numerical sun protection factor; the higher the number the more protection is afforded. Patients should be cautioned that the sunscreen should be reapplied after swimming or profuse sweating and that sun exposure must still be limited to prevent adverse effects.

sun·screen

(sŭn'skrēn),
A topical product that protects the skin from ultraviolet-induced erythema and resists washing off; its use also reduces formation of solar keratoses and reduces ultraviolet-B-induced melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers and wrinkling.

sunscreen

/sun·screen/ (-skrēn) a substance applied to the skin to protect it from the effects of the sun's rays.

sunscreen

(sŭn′skrēn′)
n.
A preparation, often in the form of a cream or lotion, used to protect the skin from the damaging ultraviolet rays of the sun.

sun′screen′ing adj.
A transparent lotion or cream containing oxybenzone and dioxybenzone, which absorb or scatters UVB light to reduce the risk of actinic-related malignancy and premalignancy

sunscreen

Public health A transparent substance lotion or cream containing oxybenzone and dioxybenzone, which absorbs or scatters UVB light, to ↓ the risk of actinic-related CA. See SPF rating Cf Melanoma, Sunblock, Tanning salon, Ultraviolet light.

sun·screen

(sŭn'skrēn)
A topical product that protects the skin from ultraviolet-induced erythema; its use also reduces formation of solar keratoses and may prevent ultraviolet B-induced skin cancer and wrinkling.

Sunscreen

Products which block the damaging rays of the sun. Good sunscreens contain either para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) or benzophenone, or both. Sunscreen protection factors range from 2-45.
Mentioned in: Sunburn

sunscreen

a topical agent that filters ultraviolet rays reaching the skin; used to prevent sunburn, actinic dermatitis, and in the control of discoid lupus erythematosus.

Patient discussion about sunscreen

Q. what does a sun block cream do? and what are a UV rays?

A. It blocks out harmful Ultra violet rays from the skin as the previous entries have related; however it can also block your ability to produce vitamin D. If you live in a northerly area or one that receives limited sunlight, its recommended to get at least 15 minutes of sun a day (this is probably best done with minimal sunblock) and according to personnal sun sensitivity. Another thing to keep in mind is that sunblock works best if applied 20 minutes before sun exposure.

More discussions about sunscreen
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies show that most people do not use enough sunscreen for it to be effective, said Dr Batra.
EWG recommended Earth's Best Mineral Sunscreen SPF 30, a light, non-greasy, fragrance-free creme that protects vulnerable skin with an effective, mineral-based sunscreen that acts as a natural UVA/UVB reflective barrier.
However, the agency has yet to approve a sunscreen ingredient through the new process.
The product can be inhaled, so don't apply it directly to your face; spray into your hand, then rub in the sunscreen.
But many of the sunscreens on the market do not provide enough protection from the sun's damaging rays.
Dr Perry argues that unlike physical sunscreen or sunscreen with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, chemical sunscreens get absorbed in the skin and quickly travel their way to the bloodstream.
People often apply much less sunscreen than they need to, to get the full protection.
The study could be used to develop post-sun exposure treatment, such as super sunscreens to repair sun damaged skin.
To determine whether consistent, daily sunscreen use could prevent progression of skin aging, researchers randomized Nambour study participants under age 55 into four groups: daily use of broad-spectrum sunscreen plus 30 mg of beta-carotene; daily sunscreen use plus a placebo supplement; discretionary sunscreen use plus 30 mg of beta-carotene; and discretionary sunscreen use plus a placebo supplement.
Dermatologists have long urged year-round sunscreen use -- especially for constantly exposed skin on the face, hands and women's neck and upper chest -- but say too few people heed that advice.
Always remember that applying sunscreen merely slows down exposure to UV rays--it never completely blocks them.
Up to now, apparently those hazy numerical "SPF" values that appear on sunscreen containers - the initials are very technical, standing for "sun protection factor" - have referred only to safeguarding you against "ultraviolet B" radiation that causes sunburn but not to the more dangerous "ultraviolet A" radiation implicated in skin cancer, dark spots and leathery wrinkles.