sundowning


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sundowning

 [sun´doun-ing]
the appearance of confusion, agitation, and other severely disruptive behavior coupled with inability to remain asleep, occurring solely or markedly worsening at night; sometimes seen in older patients with dementia or other mental disorders.

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing),
The onset or exacerbation of delirium during the evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; most often seen in mid and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.

sundowning

(sŭn′dou′nĭng)
n.
A state of disorientation and agitation that sometimes occurs in the late afternoon or evening in people with dementia.
A term for disorientation, agitation, or general worsening of mental symptoms classically described in the elderly at dusk or nightfall
Aetiology Sedatives, analgesics, hypnotics
Risk factors Dementia, organic brain syndrome, vision or hearing defects, dehydration, fatigue
Management Increase hydration, ensure adequate rest, reduce stress—i.e., do not test their memory, agree with them whenever possible

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing)
The onset or exacerbation of delirium during the evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; most often seen in the middle and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing)
Exacerbation of delirium during evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; common in mid and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
"There's not a whole lot known about what mechanisms might be involved in sundowning, and it's very poorly understood," said William "Trey" Todd, a research fellow in neurology at Harvard Medical School.
By isolating these "sundowning" costs, we can develop a more accurate business case analysis for those programs in the prime of life.
A Sundowning is a term used to describe behavioral changes in the late afternoon or evening, such as increased confusion, anxiety, or agitation, that affect people with dementia.
Nonetheless, very encouraging findings come from studies showing that Alzheimer's patients taking melatonin experience improved sleep patterns, less sundowning, and slower progression of cognitive impairment.
If it were up to social workers, and not to a writer of literary short smiles, the camp would surely be called "Camp Sunshine." Englander reveals the deeper meaning of the story's title--and of the story--by the artful insertion into the text of a single vocabulary item--"sundowning"--a type of evening dementia causing confusion or hallucinations, mainly in the elderly.
Etcher's work is inspired by her interest in a phenomenon known as "sundowning," when Alzheimer's patients sleep during the day, wake up later and may be up all night long.
The findings could help explain "sundowning," a syndrome in which older adults show high levels of anxiety, agitation, and delirium in late afternoon and evening before they normally would go to bed.
Conditions that need to be differentiated from delirium Delirium Depression Dementia Psychosis Alertness Abnormal Normal Normal Normal Onset Sudden and Gradual Gradual Gradual recent Course Fluctuates May vary Progressive, may No frequently slightly be slightly fluctuation and be worse in worse in evening morning (sundowning) The CAM's sensitivity is 94 - 100% and its specificity is 90 - 95%.
The hospice nurses called it "sundowning." My sister-in-law, who had just moved her father into a locked memory care unit, called it "dementia's 36-hour day."
Sundowning in older people with dementia: Evidence based nursing assessment and interventions.
Later, I learned about "sundowning," the confused behavior that often happens at the end of the day, a symptom that occurs in people with dementia, possibly caused by Alzheimer's.
Likewise, the poem "Sundowning" takes the standard romantic/lyric devices of attributing human characteristics and transcendent power to Nature, and makes something creepy and menacing, rather than sentimental or safe, from them: