sundowning


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sundowning

 [sun´doun-ing]
the appearance of confusion, agitation, and other severely disruptive behavior coupled with inability to remain asleep, occurring solely or markedly worsening at night; sometimes seen in older patients with dementia or other mental disorders.

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing),
The onset or exacerbation of delirium during the evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; most often seen in mid and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.

sundowning

(sŭn′dou′nĭng)
n.
A state of disorientation and agitation that sometimes occurs in the late afternoon or evening in people with dementia.

sundowning

[sun′douning]
Etymology: AS, sunne + ofdune, off the hill
a condition in which persons with cognitive impairment and elderly people tend to become confused or disoriented at the end of the day. Many of them have diminished visual acuity and varying degrees of sensorineural and conduction hearing loss. With less light, they lose visual cues that help them to compensate for their sensory impairments. It may also be a result of decreased sensory stimulation, especially in the evening, when there is less environmental activity and less structure. Sundowning is most common with dementia, Alzheimer's type, and is seen with delirium.
A term for disorientation, agitation, or general worsening of mental symptoms classically described in the elderly at dusk or nightfall
Aetiology Sedatives, analgesics, hypnotics
Risk factors Dementia, organic brain syndrome, vision or hearing defects, dehydration, fatigue
Management Increase hydration, ensure adequate rest, reduce stress—i.e., do not test their memory, agree with them whenever possible

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing)
The onset or exacerbation of delirium during the evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; most often seen in the middle and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.

sun·down·ing

(sŭn'down-ing)
Exacerbation of delirium during evening or night with improvement or disappearance during the day; common in mid and later stages of dementing disorders, such as Alzheimer disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought that sundowning and other disruptive behaviors may result from abnormalities that interfere with normal circadian rhythm and behavioral regulation.
Drugs used to control levels of this enzyme sometimes are employed on dementia patients, although there has been no research evidence that it actually had an effect on sundowning.
Keywords: sundowning, dementia, group singing, mood and social behaviour, personhood
1) Nevertheless, as can be seen from Table 1, irrespective of overall percentage of patients affected, sundowning would appear to touch virtually all groups in which there is some degree of cognitive involvement.
Major tranquilizers are useful for the demented and especially good for sundowning, but should not be used in the average elderly patient.
I vaguely remembered reading about sundowning among the elderly, but I have never heard the term used locally, even by our geriatricians.
According to the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, sundowning is a synoptom of dementia.
The world report said families need early education about what services are available to help before they're in a crisis, plus training in how to handle the behavioral problems of the disease -- such as not to argue if their loved one thinks Ronald Reagan is still president, or how to handle the agitation at dusk known as sundowning, or how to react when the patient hits someone.
There have been a few clinical studies documenting sundowning, but until now there hasn't been research in animals to see what's going on in the brain to explain this," she added.
This phenomenon is called sundowning (McCurry, Reynolds, Ancoli-Israel, Teri, & Vitiello, 2000), a constellation of increasing behavioral disturbances in patients with dementia in the late afternoon or early evening (Vitiello & Borson, 2001).
Sundowning is as one of the complications associated with Alzheimer's disease, affecting 2.