sundown syndrome


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sundowning

 [sun´doun-ing]
the appearance of confusion, agitation, and other severely disruptive behavior coupled with inability to remain asleep, occurring solely or markedly worsening at night; sometimes seen in older patients with dementia or other mental disorders.
A term for disorientation, agitation, or general worsening of mental symptoms classically described in the elderly at dusk or nightfall
Aetiology Sedatives, analgesics, hypnotics
Risk factors Dementia, organic brain syndrome, vision or hearing defects, dehydration, fatigue
Management Increase hydration, ensure adequate rest, reduce stress—i.e., do not test their memory, agree with them whenever possible

sundown syndrome

Sundowning Psychiatry A term for disorientation , agitation, or general worsening of mental Sx affecting some elderly persons at dusk or nightfall Clinical Picking at bed clothing, banging on bedrails, shouting Etiology Sedatives, analgesics, hypnotics Risk factors Dementia, organic brain syndrome, vision or hearing defects, dehydration, fatigue
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References in periodicals archive ?
Throw in the fear of malignant supernatural spirits and you can imagine the sundown syndrome becoming quite severe, complete with visual and auditory hallucinations.
Some researchers believe there may be no circadian rhythmicity to sundown syndrome.
When they are most tired at the end of the day caretakers may have to find extra energy to deal with their loved one's agitated, restless behavior from sundown syndrome.
Sundown Syndrome (SDS) is a phenomenon experienced by individuals who have dementia and is characterized by an exaggeration of disruptive behaviors in the twilight and evening hours (Dewing, 2003; La Garce, 2004; Staedt & Stoppe, 2005).
To date, researchers have not found the cause of Sundown Syndrome (SDS), and few theories have been formulated to explain the pathophysiology of SDS.
Sundown Syndrome is defined as the "collective effects of cognitive and behavioral changes in people with dementia that take place, for a variety of reasons, around late afternoon to nightfall" (Dewing, 2003, p.
The purpose of this practice protocol was to examine effects of sunlight exposure on the behaviors and sleep quality of one individual, Ben, who was diagnosed with dementia and who frequently demonstrated agitated behaviors that are common manifestations of Sundown Syndrome.
1 Upon reviewing table 1, it will be apparent to the reader that the relationship between degree of cognitive impairment and prevalence of sundowning is not linear for this group of patients, but rather that there appears to be an optimal range within which a patient may be susceptible to Sundown Syndrome, i.