summation


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sum·ma·tion

(sŭm-ā'shŭn),
The aggregation of a number of similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

summation

(sə-mā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of adding; addition.
2. A sum or aggregate.
3. A concluding argument after the presentation of a legal case, especially an argument made to a judge or jury by an attorney for a party as to why that party should prevail.
4. Physiology The process by which multiple or repeated stimuli can produce a response in a nerve, muscle, or other part that one stimulus alone cannot produce.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sum·ma·tion

(sŭ-mā'shŭn)
The aggregation of a number of similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

summation

the production of an effect by the repetition of stimuli, any single one of which would be insufficient to produce an effect, as in muscular contraction where summation brings about TETANUS which results from a series of stimuli. See RODS and CONES CELLS for the effect of summation in the eye.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

summation 

Increased effect produced by a series of stimuli applied either simultaneously or successively (provided the intervals are greater than the latent period). Binocular summation usually occurs when the two eyes are stimulated; thus binocular brightness is greater than monocular, except in the unusual Fechner's paradox. Two or more stimuli falling within the excitatory region of a receptive field will increase the excitatory response and similarly two or more stimuli falling within the inhibitory region of a receptive field will increase the inhibition: this is called spatial summation. The summation may also occur if successive stimulations are received by the same retinal region: this is called temporal summation. See complex cell; simple cell; receptive field; lateral inhibition.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

sum·ma·tion

(sŭ-mā'shŭn)
Aggregation of several similar neural impulses or stimuli.
[Mediev. L. summatio, fr. summo, pp. -atus, to sum up, fr. L. summa, sum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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AccessData's AD Summation legal review solution is the gold standard throughout the legal community, having received 45+ legal industry technology and Reader's Choice awards since 1997.
From Figures 4(a) and 4(b), it is observed that the convergence of [K.sup.zz.sub.11] and determinant of K matrix changes from 1/[N.sub.max] using the direct summation to 1/[N.sup.3.sub.max] using up to second leading term and finally to 1/[N.sup.5.sub.max] using up to fourth leading term.
AccessData's award-winning AD Summation legal review technology, addresses the right half of the EDRM model and is the gold standard throughout the legal community, having received more than 45 legal industry technology and "Reader's Choice" awards since 1997.
CT Summation is the premier provider of litigation support and eDiscovery solutions that help legal professionals succeed from discovery to case review and analysis through production.
Unfortunately, Ramanujan (who very rarely gave any proofs) did not provide a proof of the above bilateral summation. The first proof of (2.4) was given by Hahn [7, [kappa] = 0 in Eq.
I would not replay any part of a day-in-the-life film or animation during summation; to me, that would almost imply that you think the jury didn't get it the first time.
Since there are ten values in the index of summation, we add the first ten values of X.
"Summation has to do with quantity judgment, not counting,' says Premack, who is also Matsuzawa's postdoctoral supervisor.
Iterating for [S.sub.3], and so on, produces the first of the two double summations. The second double summation is obtained from expanding the first one and then regrouping like terms in p.
I shall be using the following summation identity, which I deduced in (10) to give the generating functions for the generalized functions.
Gauss second summation theorem is defined by [Prud., 491(7.3.7.5)]
To deal with [summation over (n[not equal to]m)] we split the summation m[not equal to] n into the ranges n [less than or equal to] m/2, m/2 < n < 2m, n [greater than or equal to] 2m.