sumac

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sumac

also

sumach

(so͞o′măk, sho͞o′-)
n.
1. Any of various shrubs or small trees of the genera Rhus and Toxicodendron, having compound leaves, clusters of small greenish flowers, and usually red, hairy fruit. Species in the genus Toxicodendron, such as poison sumac, have toxic sap.
2. A tart, dark reddish-brown powder made from the ground dried fruits of a Eurasian sumac (Rhus coriaria), used as a seasoning in Middle Eastern cuisine.

Patient discussion about sumac

Q. is poison ivy or sumac contagious

A. if you scratch the rash and it has open sores,the pus from the sores can spread to other parts of the body and to other people as well,

More discussions about sumac
References in periodicals archive ?
So we queried Sumach, and they thought so too, and soon we had a contract and were wording our call for submissions.
Some of the material in this article is published in A Change of Plans: Women's Stories of Hemorrhagic Stroke (Sumach Press, 2007) by Sharon Dale Stone, available at: www.sumachpress.com.
I am reading a review of Canadian author Gall Sidonie Sobat's new book of fiction, The Book of Mary published by Sumach Press.
Elizabeth granted him some leases and a monopoly on importing aniseed and sumach; his business ventures and his medical practice brought him the reputation of great wealth, though perhaps not the actuality.
A favourite from my childhood is Rhus typhina (stag's horn sumach), which again can be treated as a tree or shrub.
So find a spot for amazing plants, such as Amelanchier, Japanese acers, the smoke bush Cotinus coggygria and stag's horn sumach to create - Keith Butterworth, Runcorn, Cheshire dramatic focal points when the temperature drops.
Rhus (stags horn sumach), cotinus (smoke bush), prunus (cherry) and betula (silver birch) offer brilliant autumn colour on all soils.
typhina, the stag's horn sumach, whose branches grow to 5m (15ft) or more if left unpruned, but be warned, it has a prolific suckering habit and tends to be invasive, so is unsuitable for lawn planting.