sulfur dioxide


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sulfur

 [sul´fer]
a chemical element, atomic number 16, atomic weight 32.064, symbol S. (See Appendix 6.)
sulfur dioxide a colorless, nonflammable gas used as an antioxidant in pharmaceutical preparations; it is also an important air pollutant, irritating the eyes and respiratory tract.
precipitated sulfur a topical scabicide, antiparasitic, antibacterial, antifungal, and keratolytic.
sublimed sulfur a topical scabicide and antiparasitic.

sul·fur di·ox·ide

a colorless, nonflammable gas with a strong, suffocating odor; a powerful reducing agent used to prevent oxidative deterioration of food and medicinal products.
See also: sulfurous acid.
Synonym(s): sulfurous oxide

sulfur dioxide

a colorless nonflammable gas used as an antioxidant in pharmaceutic preparations. It is also an important air pollutant, irritating the eyes and respiratory tract.

sulfur di·ox·ide

(SO2) (sŭlfŭr dī-oksīd)
Colorless, nonflammable gas with a strong, suffocating odor; a powerful reducing agent used to prevent oxidative deterioration of food and medicinal products.

sulfur

a chemical element, atomic number 16, atomic weight 32.064, symbol S. See Table 6. Elemental sulfur is fed to animals to reduce their volume of feed intake, for example in a feedlot using self-feeders. It is also fed as an oldfashioned worm prophylaxis and coccidiostat.
Overfeeding of elemental sulfur causes enteritis characterized by black, evil smelling diarrhea. See also hydrogen sulfide poisoning.

sulfur dioxide
a poisonous gas liberated by some industrial enterprises, e.g. copper smelting, from silage to which sodium metabisulfite has been added as a preservative and in oldfashioned treatments for mange. The gas causes irritation of the upper respiratory tract and pneumonia in severe cases. Commonly used as a meat preservative where it selectively destroys thiamin and has been incriminated as a cause of thiamin deficiency, particularly in dogs and cats.
sulfur granule
small, soft to mineralized bodies in the pus of lesions of actinomycosis. Called also drusen.
lime-sulfur
sulfur myopathy
skeletal and myocardial degeneration caused by the feeding of toxic levels of sulfur.
sulfur nutritional deficiency
ruminants may need supplemental inorganic sulfur if the bulk of their nitrogen is not in the form of protein but as urea or ammonium phosphate. A deficiency in these circumstances causes anorexia, weight loss, poor digestion and fall in milk yield.
precipitated sulfur
a scabicide, antiparasitic, antifungal and keratolytic. Called also milk of sulfur.
sulfur stinker
a can of preserved meat contaminated by Clostridium nigrificans causing the formation of hydrogen sulfide, and black or purple staining of the inside of the can.
sulfur sublimatum, sublimed sulfur
a parasiticide and scabicide. Called also flowers of sulfur.
technetium coated sulfur colloid
used in scintigraphy of the liver and reticuloendothelial systems. Called also 99mTc sulfur colloid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The overall removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide in the biofilter packed with peat is shown in Figure 4.
Yet the ecological value of such community initiatives, worthy as they are, pales beside the environmental and health damage wrought by the nearly 165,000 tons of sulfur dioxide and other toxic pollution released by Bowen.
Sulfur dioxide levels exceeding the environmental standard, less than 0.
In fact, ambient levels of particulates and sulfur dioxide have been declining ever since accurate records have been kept.
Applied as a gas, sulfur dioxide protects grapes from botrytis, an unattractive gray mold.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) always has regulated sulfur dioxide emission by setting emission standards.
Sulfur dioxide fumigation and slow-release sulfur dioxide pads have been widely used to kill mold and prevent rotting in table grapes, but sulfur dioxide is highly corrosive to refrigeration equipment, leaves sulfite residues, and can cause health and environmental problems.
Although eruptions do emit greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, volcanoes also spew sulfur dioxide.
The 10-minute mean for sulfur dioxide is 500 micrograms/[m.
EPA alleges that in 1994, Mittal modified a coke oven battery, resulting in a significant increase in sulfur dioxide emissions, without getting a state permit that would have required the best available technology to control the emissions.
Large volcanic eruptions send much sulfur dioxide high into the atmosphere, where the gas forms aerosols of tiny droplets.
The pollutants studied included fine and ultrafine particulates of various compositions, nitrogen oxides, elemental and organic carbon, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide.