sulfiting agents

sulfiting agents

[sul′fīting]
food preservatives composed of potassium or sodium bisulfite or potassium metabisulfite. Sulfiting agents are used in the processing of beer, wine, baked goods, soup mixes, and some imported seafood and by restaurants to impart a "fresh" appearance to salad fruits and vegetables. The chemicals can cause a severe allergic reaction in people who are hypersensitive to sulfites. The reactions are marked by flushing, faintness, hives, headache, GI distress, breathing difficulty, and, in extreme cases, loss of consciousness and death.
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Sulfiting agents are often used to control browning.
Sulfiting agents prevent discoloration (in dried fruit, some fresh shrimp, and some dried, fried, or frozen potatoes) and bacterial growth (in wine).
While Carter has chosen to maintain the vineyard organically, she said the wine she produces won't be considered organic because she must add sulfiting agents to keep the wine stable.
Sulfiting agents (sulfuric acid derivatives) are added to many perishable foods to keep them from turning color.
But concern in recent years over life-threatening reactions to these preservatives by some asthmatics has led many people to question whether sulfiting agents like sulfure dioxide are absolutely necessary (SN: 12/13/86, p.
Although the current FDA proposal has no bearing on these products, FDA says in announcing its new measure in this week's Federal Register that it "intends to address all other uses of sulfiting agents, including.
Sulfur dioxide and other sulfiting agents can be lethal to some asthmatics.