sulfide


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sulfide

 [sul´fīd]
any binary compound of sulfur; a compound of sulfur with another element or base.

sul·fide

(sŭl'fīd),
1. A compound of sulfur in which the sulfur has a valence of -2; for example, Na2S, HgS.
2. A thioether (that is, R-S-R', such as lanthionine).
Synonym(s): sulfuret

sul·fide

(sŭl'fīd)
A compound of sulfur in which the sulfur has a valence of -2.
Synonym(s): sulphide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, in the absence of a federal ambient air quality standard for hydrogen sulfide, many states have promulgated their own hydrogen sulfide standards--but others have not.
Different degrees of tolerance to hydrogen sulfide in populations of Macoma balthica (Bivalvia, Telinidae).
If you are involved in the Hydrogensulfide (CAS 7783-06-4) (Hydrogen Sulfide) industry or aim to be, then this study will provide you inclusive point of view.
Hydrogen sulfide molecules naturally occur in the human body, but can be deadly in excess amounts.
Metal sulfides are not simple fillers (if the term can be used) but fundamental components of friction materials.
However, in spite of steady demand from end-use industries, market growth will remain sluggish over the forecast period owing to the hazardous effects of sodium sulfide. The broader industry-wide scrutiny by regulatory authorities will negatively impact demand for sodium sulfide, with cleaner, less harmful chemicals gaining traction.
Morris, "Kinetics of oxidation of aqueous sulfide by oxygen," Environmental Science and Technology, vol.
According to the researchers, the most important achievement of this research is to increase the efficiency of blue light LED containing cadmium sulfide nanostructures.
The new work, by James Mitchell of the Harvard School of Public Health and colleagues, suggests that cutting calories prompts cells to produce hydrogen sulfide. Animal cells can use the gas as a fuel, which makes tissues more resilient and prolongs the lives of lab organisms.
Sulfite (SO2) added to the must as potassium metabisulfite (KMBS) bypasses the regulatory sulfate-reduction pathway by diffusing through the cell membrane and immediately reorienting in hydrogen sulfide. Large additions of KMBS to the must (more than 80 ppm) have been shown to increase [H.sub.2]S concentrations in wine.
Some studies have suggested that reducing caloric intake prompts cells to produce hydrogen sulfide. Another way of triggering the cells to make hydrogen sulfide gas is to reduce protein intake rather than reduce caloric intake.
Lemle's theory claimed that a lack of hydrogen sulfide homeostasis within an organism can also cause many diseases.