sulfhemoglobinemia


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sulf·he·mo·glo·bi·ne·mi·a

(sulf-hē'mō-glō'bi-nē'mē-ă),
A morbid condition due to the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood; it is marked by a persistent cyanosis, but the blood count does not reveal any special abnormality in that fluid; it is thought to be caused by the action of hydrogen sulfide absorbed from the intestine.

sulfhemoglobinemia

/sulf·he·mo·glo·bin·emia/ (-he″mo-glo″bin-e´me-ah) sulfmethemoglobin in the blood.

sulfhemoglobinemia

[-ē′mē·ə]
the presence of abnormal sulfur-containing hemoglobin circulating in the blood.

sulf·he·mo·glo·bi·ne·mi·a

(sŭlf-hē'mō-glō'bi-nē'mē-ă)
A morbid condition due to the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood; it is marked by a persistent cyanosis, but the blood count does not reveal any abnormality in blood cells; thought to be caused by the action of hydrogen sulfide absorbed from the intestine.
Synonym(s): sulphaemoglobinaemia.

sulfhemoglobinemia (sulfēm´əglō´binē´mēə),

n an abnormality of the heme moiety of the hemoglobin molecule resulting from inorganic sulfides (e.g., acetanilide).

sulfhemoglobinemia

high levels of sulfhemoglobin in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sulfhemoglobinemia is the relatively uncommon condition of excess sulfhemoglobin (SulfHb) in the blood.
We describe here a patient poisoned by paint ingestion who also had sulfhemoglobinemia.
Three reports have described sulfhemoglobinemia associated with phenazopyridine ingestion [12-14], and several others report dapsone ("DDS") as a cause [2,15-18].
Carpenter, in a recent review of cyanosis, classified sulfhemoglobinemia in the category of causes of "central cyanosis"--the blue to slate-like discoloration of the sublingual region and tongue--which "alone indicates a probable medical emergency" [26].
Lim and Lower suggest exchange transfusion as a means of managing extreme sulfhemoglobinemia [13]; this would be rare, however, because in many cases the patient can tolerate high amounts of SulfHb.
In conclusion, we present a case of sulfhemoglobinemia possibly caused by paint ingestion, an association that has not been reported before.
Hemolytic anemia and sulfhemoglobinemia due to phenacetin abuse: a case with multivisceral adverse effects.