sulfanilamide


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sulfanilamide

 [sul″fah-nil´ah-mīd]
a potent antibacterial compound. Although replaced as a systemic agent by more effective and less toxic derivatives, and by antibiotics; it is still used vaginally in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

sul·fa·nil·a·mide

(sŭl'fă-nil'ă-mīd),
The first sulfonamide used for its chemotherapeutic effect in infections.

sulfanilamide

(sŭl′fə-nĭl′ə-mīd′, -mĭd)
n.
A white, odorless crystalline sulfonamide, C6H8N2SO2, used in the treatment of various bacterial infections.

sulfanilamide

[sul′fah-nil′ah-mīd]
a potent antibacterial compound. Although replaced as a systemic agent by more effective and less toxic derivatives and by antibiotics, it is still used vaginally in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

sulfanilamide

a potent antibacterial compound, the first of the sulfonamides, the first real antibacterial and the drug that opened the door into the antibiotic era.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sulfa drugs sulfanilamide, sulfapyridine, and sulfathizole prepared by organic chemistry students were tested in microbiology experiments.
1938) Pathologic effects of elixir of sulfanilamide (diethylene glycol poisoning).
The Griess reagent consists of sulfanilamide (58 mM in 3 M HCl) and N-1-naphtylethylenediamine (722 [micro]M).
In 1937, more than a hundred people died in the United States as a result of using a drug formulated with a toxic solvent in what came to be known as the Elixir Sulfanilamide Tragedy.
Carol Ballentine, Taste of Raspberries, Taste of Death: The 1937 Elixir Sulfanilamide Incident, FDA CONSUMER, June 1981, available at http://www.
Rocky was treated for sulfanilamide, Bactrim, and Septra (found in meats which putatively block sulfur metabolism in the whole body), 23 different mercury salts, cadmium diazinon, DDT-DDE, insulin, pancreas, benzene, xylene, toluene, dioxin, HGH, PCBs, heptachlor, testosterone, formaldehyde-formic acid, petroleum, atrazine, carbon tetrachloride, methyl ethyl ketone, glucagon, leptin, liver, and heart.
For example, the predecessor of the Food and Drug Administration was empowered to demand premarket approval of drags as a result of poisoning by elixir sulfanilamide in 1937.
24) See Deaths Following Elixir of Sulfanilamide-Massengill, 109 JAMA 1367, 1367 (1937); see also Carol Ballentine, Taste of Raspberries, Taste of Death: The 1937 Elixir Sulfanilamide Incident, FDA CONSUMER, June 1981, at 18, 21.
5 by coupling diazotized sulfanilamide with N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NED dihydrochloride).