sulfa drug


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sulfa drug

n.
Any of a group of synthetic organic compounds, derived chiefly from sulfanilamide, chemically similar to PABA and capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and activity by interfering with the metabolic processes in bacteria that require PABA. Also called sulfonamide.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sulfa drug

Any sulfur-based antibiotic, in particular sulfonamides
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sulfa drug

Any drug of the sulfonamide group possessing bacteriostatic properties.
See also: drug
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
About half of those studies did not detect any association between the mutations and an increased risk of death caused by PCP (5-8) or a decreased response to sulfa drugs (3,9-11).
Al-Ansari, A new Series of Schiff Bases Derived from Sulfa Drugs and Indole-3-Carboxaldehyde: Synthesis, Characterization, Spectral and DFT Computational Studies, J.
Sulfa drugs: From the first moments of World War II, the US military used sulfa drugs (short for sulfonamide) to help injured personnel beat infections.
The success of sulfa drugs sparked interest in finding other agents.
The reason this message is important is because sulfa drugs are unreliable for the treatment of streptococcal infections.
One of the reasons I like the sulfa drugs for treatment is that they are also effective against some bacterial diarrheas.
All antibiotics discovered to date have a limited useful life - sulfa drugs, for instance, were developed in 1932, introduced in 1936 and the first instances of resistance were noted in 1942.
Your records could say your blood type is B+ when it's actually A-, that you have no allergies when you're deathly allergic to sulfa drugs, or that the appendix that has just burst and is turning your insides septic has already been removed.
Sulfa drugs, anticonvulsants, and NSAIDs are the drugs most commonly associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome.
Q Is it OK to take a diuretic if I'm allergic to sulfa drugs?
He said the different types of substances produce allergy including pollen grains of flowers, dust particles, house dust mite, outdoor and indoor moulds or fungus, insect venom of bee, animal dander like sloughed off skin, saliva and excreta of dog or cat secretions and excretions of birds, body parts and excreta of insects like cockroach, foods like milk, egg, fish, prawns, beef, mutton, chicken, peanuts, and some drugs like penicillin, sulfa drugs and insulin.