suicidology


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su·i·ci·dol·o·gy

(sū'i-sī-dol'ŏ-jē),
A branch of the behavioral sciences devoted to the study of the nature, causes, and prevention of suicide.
[suicide + G. logos, study]

suicidology

(so͞o′ĭ-sī-dŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of suicide, suicidal behavior, and suicide prevention.

su′i·cid·ol′o·gist n.
The formal multidisciplinary study of suicide and suicidal behaviour
References in periodicals archive ?
Source for male statistics: Alan Berman, Ph.D., executive director of the American Association of Suicidology, Washington, D.C.
DSM-V and the future of suicidology. Crisis 2011, 32, 233-239.
Wasserman (Eds.), Oxford textbook of suicidology and suicide prevention: A global perspective (pp.
As part of a focused study of deaths in 2010 and 2011, AAS will join the effort, lending their expertise in suicidology and public health policy.
Finally, the American Association of Suicidology refers to various warning signs for suicidal behavior (i.e., behaviors that those at acute risk for suicidal behavior often demonstrate, such as "acting reckless" and "feeling trapped"; American Association of Suicidology [n.d.], Additional Warning Signs).
Harrington is an approved trainer for the Assessing and Managing Suicidal Risk curriculum for mental health professionals on behalf of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SAMHSA) and the American Association of Suicidology. Since 2008, she has developed and taught the curriculum for the Suicide Prevention, Intervention, and Postvention courses for the UAB and the University of Montevallo.
Nevertheless, this book provides clarity to the complex clinical and research issues related to suicidology. Given the diverse cultural and professional backgrounds of the contributors, the text is exceptionally coherent with individual chapters that are magically woven around the core framework.
FROM THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SUICIDOLOGY
The American Association of Suicidology's Web site states that suicide ranks second as a cause of death among young Americans, age 18-24, behind accidents and homicides.
Emergency departments (EDs) could he excellent places for mental health screening and intervention during long wait times, Roisin O'Mara and her associates suggested in a poster presentation at the annual conference of the American Society of Suicidology. Previous studies suggest that ED visits provide "teachable moments" when adolescents may be receptive to interventions, said Ms.
Secretary of the Irish Association of Suicidology Dr John Connolly said: "There is overwhelming scientific evidence that inappropriate portrayal of suicide in media and film can lead to copycat suicides.
They will use the one-day Core Competencies curriculum developed for SPRC by the American Association of Suicidology to train active duty and civilian mental health professionals and mental health technicians.