suicide machine


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suicide machine

A device invented by Dr Jack Kevorkian, which allows personal control over a painless suicide.
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Through these plans, people around the world would be able to 3D-print and assemble their own suicide machine.
America's Jack Kevorkian achieved worldwide fame - or infamy - in 1990 when he and his "Suicide Machine" helped a 54-year-old in the early stages of Alzheimer's shuffle off her mortal.
The medic - who created a suicide machine from a laptop and needle - declined to reveal which Sydney showbiz agents he was working with.
A CONTROVERSIAL German doctor who invented a suicide machine has revealed he has been contacted by desperate Midlanders - and is willing to help them die.
SYDNEY: An elderly Australian man killed himself with a home-made suicide machine he assembled with plans downloaded from the Internet.
Perhaps now, with them, we can begin to envision what it would mean for us to confront the suicide machine of our world in the way of Jesus, to expose it and deconstruct it, to intercept its trajectory and turn it to a better way, to reclaim its potential for ends more in line with their original creation.
In 1997, the Detroit Free Press launched a major investigative series, later reprinted in book form as The Suicide Machine, that studied forty-seven of Kevorkian's cases (some from outside Oakland County).
Kevorkian and his suicide machine.[2] This argument, however, ignores the fact that making physician-assisted suicide legal does not necessarily make it ethical or moral.
They could be Rube Goldberg machines for the severely mechanically challenged, and in fact the artist describes These Colors Don't Run, 1991-93, (which includes an American flag flying over a garbage can hiding exposed wiring) as a suicide machine.
In the termination of feeding or, indeed, in capital punishment, Kevorkian has suggested that doctors should not use his suicide machine; instead, consistent with the principles of autonomy and dignity, the patients themselves (or trusted relatives) must take the final action.
"Use of 'Suicide Machine' Alarms Medical Ethicists." HealthWeek 4(11),1,71, June 11,1990
With an assisted suicide machine. I laughed at this, a bit more than I expected to.