sugared beverage

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sugared beverage

, sugar-sweetened beverage, sugary beverage
A drink, carbonated or uncarbonated, to which corn syrup, glucose, or other sweetening agents have been added. They are a significant source of calories in the diet, esp. in children, adolescents, and young adults, and contribute to tooth decay.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As such, the technology is ideal for manufacturers seeking to increase their investment in stevia usage especially in response to the ongoing marked trend towards reduced sugary beverage consumption.
A sugary beverage tax would reduce obesity the most among teens ages 13 to 18.
Seventy-eight percent drink one or less sugary beverage a day, with the highest level in the 30-39 year age group (consistent with the overweight/obesity group).
Seventy eight percent drink one or less sugary beverage a day, with the highest level in the 30-39 year age group (consistent with the overweight/obesity group)
In this ad, a glob of fat flies at youths when they consume a sugary beverage.
Certainly, it provides strong justification for reducing sugary beverage consumption among patients and, more importantly, in the general population.
While it is true that Americans have decreased their sugary beverage consumption in the last decade, that change has coincided with, not an increase, but a leveling off of American obesity rates during the same general time period, according to the most reliable CDC statistics.
Prevention strategies include exercise, limitation of red meat and sugary beverage intake, and supplementation with coffee and vitamin C.
For children, the risk of obesity soars 60 percent with each daily serving of soda or sugary beverage.
Instituting a sugary beverage tax may be an appealing public policy option to curb obesity, but it's not as easy to use taxes to curb obesity as it is with smoking," Chen Zhen, Ph.
East/Central Eurasia had the largest numbers of cardiovascular deaths (11,000) related to sugary beverage consumption in 2010.
Although some unsympathetically see the epidemic as solely the consequence of individual choice, gluttony or laziness, public health experts offer more sensible explanations: the near-elimination of the family meal; the upsurge in consumption of both fast food and seductive, addictive passive entertainment; growth of neighborhoods whose design discourages biking and walking; the super-sizing of portions; the rise of soda and sugary beverage consumption; and the trend towards gradual disappearance of physical education classes in schools.