sugared beverage

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sugared beverage

, sugar-sweetened beverage, sugary beverage
A drink, carbonated or uncarbonated, to which corn syrup, glucose, or other sweetening agents have been added. They are a significant source of calories in the diet, esp. in children, adolescents, and young adults, and contribute to tooth decay.
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The American Beverage Association (ABA) and their associates have spent millions upon millions of dollars lobbying against sugary beverage taxes across the nation.
Our findings indicate an association between higher sugary beverage intake and brain atrophy, including lower brain volume and poorer memory," explained corresponding author Matthew Pase.
Berkeley, California, a city with many high-earning and educated residents, was America's first to implement a sugary beverage tax, in November 2014.
13) Following the introduction of Mexico's 1-peso-per-liter sugary beverage tax in 2013, sales fell by 5.
Also factored in were unhealthy habits and consequences such as the percentage of residents who are physically inactive, have high cholesterol, diabetes, and the prevalence of sugary beverage consumption.
Although neither total sucrose nor fructose intake had a significant effect on patient outcome, sugary beverage intake did--possibly because the sugars in beverages and processed foods are more quickly absorbed than sugars found in whole fruit.
Seventy-eight percent drink one or less sugary beverage a day, with the highest level in the 30-39 year age group (consistent with the overweight/obesity group).
Seventy eight percent drink one or less sugary beverage a day, with the highest level in the 30-39 year age group (consistent with the overweight/obesity group)
In this ad, a glob of fat flies at youths when they consume a sugary beverage.
Certainly, it provides strong justification for reducing sugary beverage consumption among patients and, more importantly, in the general population.
While it is true that Americans have decreased their sugary beverage consumption in the last decade, that change has coincided with, not an increase, but a leveling off of American obesity rates during the same general time period, according to the most reliable CDC statistics.