sugared beverage

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sugared beverage

, sugar-sweetened beverage, sugary beverage
A drink, carbonated or uncarbonated, to which corn syrup, glucose, or other sweetening agents have been added. They are a significant source of calories in the diet, esp. in children, adolescents, and young adults, and contribute to tooth decay.
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According to the research, this sugary beverage is positively associated with early deaths.
In the first stage of the study, the researchers allowed the mice to drink the sugary beverage freely.
Over a period of six years, participants who drank at least 24 ounces of sugary beverage daily were twice as likely to die from heart disease as those consuming less than one ounce.
Berkeley, California, a city with many high-earning and educated residents, was America's first to implement a sugary beverage tax, in November 2014.
(13) Following the introduction of Mexico's 1-peso-per-liter sugary beverage tax in 2013, sales fell by 5.5% in the first year and 9.7% in the second year (compared to pre-tax sales figures), with the largest declines among low-socioeconomic populations.
Although neither total sucrose nor fructose intake had a significant effect on patient outcome, sugary beverage intake did--possibly because the sugars in beverages and processed foods are more quickly absorbed than sugars found in whole fruit.
East/Central Eurasia had the largest numbers of cardiovascular deaths (11,000) related to sugary beverage consumption in 2010.
Seventy eight percent drink one or less sugary beverage a day, with the highest level in the 30-39 year age group (consistent with the overweight/obesity group)
In this ad, a glob of fat flies at youths when they consume a sugary beverage.
Concern remains that sugary beverage substitutes, such as juices or sugar-sweetened water, could be a substitute for soda after taxation, especially because of the increasing popularity of these drinks over the course of time (Nielsen and Popkin, 2004; Wang, Bleich, and Gortmaker, 2008).