sugar cube


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sugar cube

Drug slang A popular street term for LSD, named for a common delivery “device”, a sugar cube
References in periodicals archive ?
METHOD Add the gin, chamomile tea, cordial and sugar cube into a chilled Champagne flute.
The director of UNRWA in Lebanon, Claudio Cordone, joined in the competition diving for a sugar cube, leaving his face covered in flour as he tried to find the sweet without his hands.
We plan that 10 to 15 years from now, we can collapse such a system in to one sugar cube - we're going to have a supercomputer in a sugar cube."
In 19th century Paris the drink was popularly served with water poured into a glass through a sugar cube. Green Utopia, which produces the La Fee brand of absinthe, attempts to recreate the history of the drink using an original recipe obtained from the Paris Absinthe Museum.
The technique may prove useful for transporting information in quantum computers of the future, which could use elements smaller than a sugar cube to carry out massively complex computations that are currently impossible.
For each drink, place a sugar cube in a champagne flute and add two tablespoons of pomegranate juice.
Have them serve it in the traditional manner, poured over a sugar cube on a slotted spoon into a glass of water.
THE Big Brother housemates scoffed 1,389 meals, guzzled 93 litres of cider, used 72 loo rolls and set one world record - when Dean built his massive sugar cube mountain.
They would also be equipped with cameras and one or two scientific instruments, each no larger than a sugar cube. "Like a colony," Marzwell says, all the individual units would keep in touch with a "mother brain" on the orbiter or on one large rover on the surface.
If there is a bet to be made today that does not involve internet snail racing then have a look at Sugar Cube Treat, who is due to run in the Murray Johnstone and Private Equity Sprint Handicap (4.50) at Ayr.
In his 2000 State of the Union address, President Clinton asked us to imagine some of the possibilities: "materials with ten times the strength of steel and only a small fraction of the weight, shrinking all of the information housed in the Library of Congress into a device the size of a sugar cube, detecting cancerous tumors when they are only a few cells in size" This year, you can buy sunscreen whose development owes a crucial debt to nanotechnology; IBM is using nanotech processes to produce read heads (part of a computer's hard drive); and samples of hybrid materials stronger than steel can be purchased online for $1000 a gram.
With a depth of just 17mm, a width of 11mm and height of 28mm, they are not so much larger than a sugar cube but they are able to compete with their 'bigger brothers' in terms of performance and efficiency, and thanks to their high switching frequency, of 100Hz, these mini photoelectric sensors are also suitable for monitoring fast-moving objects.