sugar


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sugar

 [shoog´ar]
a sweet carbohydrate of either animal or vegetable origin; the two principal groups are the disaccharides and the monosaccharides.
beet sugar sucrose from sugar beets.
blood sugar
1. glucose occurring in the blood.
2. the amount of glucose in the blood.
cane sugar sucrose from sugar cane.
fruit sugar fructose.
invert sugar a mixture of equal amounts of dextrose and fructose, obtained by hydrolyzing sucrose; used in solution as a parenteral nutrient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sug·ar

(shu'găr), Avoid the colloquial substitution of this word for glucose unless the meaning is clear from the context.
One of the sugars, which see, pharmaceutical forms are compressible sugar and confectioner's sugar.
See also: sugars.
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sugar

(sho͝og′ər)
n.
1. A sweet crystalline or powdered substance, white when pure, consisting of sucrose obtained mainly from sugarcane and sugar beets and used in many foods, drinks, and medicines to improve their taste. Also called table sugar.
2. Any of a class of water-soluble crystalline carbohydrates, including sucrose and lactose, having a characteristically sweet taste and classified as monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides.

sug′ar·er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sugar

A water-soluble, crystallizable carbohydrate that is the primary source of energy and structural components. See Amino sugar, Non-reducing sugar, Reducing sugar.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sug·ar

(shug'ăr)
Colloquial usage for sucrose; pharmaceutic forms include compressible sugar and confectioner's sugar.
See also: sugars
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sugar

a simple form of CARBOHYDRATE, formed of MONOSACCHARIDE units. Such molecules can exist in either a straight chain or a ring form. The straight chain contains a C=O group; if this group is terminal the sugar has the properties of an aldehyde (aldose sugar), if nonterminal the sugar acts as a ketone (ketose sugar). Both aldose and ketose sugars can be oxidized and will reduce alkaline copper solutions (see FEHLING'S TEST, BENEDICT'S TEST). They are thus called REDUCING SUGARS. Several disaccharides such as maltose and lactose are also reducing sugars. Sucrose, however, is a nonreducing sugar in which the linkage of glucose and fructose masks the potential aldehyde group of glucose and the potential ketone group of fructose, so that no reduction occurs in the Fehling's and Benedict's tests.

The backbone of the sugar can be of varying lengths, containing as little as three carbons (triose sugars) but, more commonly five carbons (pentose sugar) and six carbons (hexose sugars).

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sug·ar

(shug'ăr)
One of the sugars, e.g., confectioners' sugar.
[G. sakcharon; L. saccharum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about sugar

Q. how high is to high sugar I have been to surgry 3 times in 2 months and I have had my sugar go over before but not like this. I went to the Dr and Hes not worried about it. In the morning it is running 124 to 143 and 2 hrs after I eat it is running 165 to 200. At the Dr office it only showed 5.6 and He said 6.5 and over is bad! I have never sugar this high ever! It is in the family, my Mom, her Mom, her Dad ECT. What do you all think about it!

A. It seems what the doctor was referring to at the office wasn't the blood glucose (sugar) measurements but rather HbA1c - a substance in the blood that reflects the sugar levels in the PAST 8-12 weeks. Surgery is a substantial stress to your body and thus can increase your blood sugar. The A1C reflects the average levels during that time so it may overcome the temporary elevation due to the surgery.

You may read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HbA1c

Q. Is there any difference in sugar. Is there any difference in sugar between flavored milk and fruit drinks or carbonated soft drinks?

A. Yes …Flavored milk contains both natural and added sugars and has less added sugar than carbonated soft drinks. It has been found that flavored milk just contributes only 2-4 % of total added sugar in kid’s diets as compared to 50-60 percent or more by soft and fruit drinks.

Q. i have high sugar problem .. how can i reduce it to a normal levels? and what medications can help me?

A. You can watch your diet and limit the amount of sugar you consume (avoid sugar containing food and drinks). In addition, watching your weight and limiting the fat and carbohydrates in your diet is also very helpful. Daily physical activity is known to be very helpful for glucose level problems, and of course medication, if necessary. You should consult a doctor about which medications to take, depending on your glucose levels. It can be either pills or insulin injections.

More discussions about sugar
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References in classic literature ?
“You may laugh, Cousin Elizabeth—you may laugh, madam,” retorted Richard, turning himself so much in his saddle as to face the party, and making dignified gestures with his whip; “but I appeal to common sense, good sense, or, what is of more importance than either, to the sense of taste, which is one of the five natural senses, whether a big loaf of sugar is not likely to contain a better illustration of a proposition than such a lump as one of your Dutch women puts under her tongue when she drinks her tea.
“It is very true that we manufacture sugar, and the inquiry is quite useful, how much?
Le Quoi—he has been in the West Indies, and has seen sugar made.
“Yes, yes,” cried Richard, “cane is the vulgar name for it, but the real term is saccharum officinarum; and what we call the sugar, or hard maple, is acer saccharinum.
“How?” said Kirby, looking up with a simplicity which, coupled with his gigantic frame and manly face, was a little ridiculous, “if you be for trade, mounsher, here is some as good sugar as you’ll find the season through.
The Frenchman approached the place where Kirby had deposited his cake of sugar, under the cover of a bark roof, and commenced the examination of the article with the eye of one who well understood its value.
“You have much experience in these things, Kirby,” he said; “what course do you pursue in making your sugar? I see you have but two kettles.”
My first boiling I push pretty smartly, till I get the virtue of the sap; but when it begins to grow of a molasses nater, like this in the kettle, one mustn’t drive the fires too hard, or you’ll burn the sugar; and burny sugar is bad to the taste, let it be never so sweet.
“No, I expect cash for it; I never dicker my sugar, But, seeing that it’s you, mounsher,” said Billy, with a Coaxing smile, “I'll agree to receive a gallon of rum, and cloth enough for two shirts if you’ll take the molasses in the bargain.
Chopping comes quite natural to me, and I wish no other employment; but Jared Ransom said that he thought the sugar was likely to be source this season, seeing that so many folks was coming into the settlement, and so I concluded to take the ‘bush’ on sheares for this one spring.
The Fairy, with all the patience of a good mother, gave him more sugar and again handed him the glass.
"Yes, sir," he said, "it's quite true, though I don't suppose it has anything to do with the sugar and salt.