suffusion

(redirected from suffuse)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.
Related to suffuse: resembles, instigated, impedes

suffusion

 [sŭ-fu´zhun]
1. the process of overspreading, or diffusion.
2. the condition of being moistened or permeated through.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

suf·fu·sion

(sŭ-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of pouring a fluid over the body.
2. A reddening of the surface.
3. The condition of being wet with a fluid.
4. Synonym(s): extravasate (2)
[L. suffusio, fr. suffundo (subf-), to pour out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

suf·fu·sion

(sŭ-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of pouring a fluid over the body.
2. A reddening of the surface.
3. The condition of being wet with a fluid.
4. Synonym(s): extravasate (2) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

suf·fu·sion

(sŭ-fyū'zhŭn)
1. Pouring a fluid over the body.
2. Reddening of the surface.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The light suffuses me, dearest ones, you who expect me to live
As I write this sentence my tastebuds are dancing a can-can and a warm glow suffuses my brain.
He explains, for instance, how the Big Bang, the reigning theory of the universe's beginning, is finding corroboration with discoveries about the microwave radiation that suffuses the sky.
His satire on pagan gods (City of God 4.8-12) is hilarious, while gallows humour suffuses his anecdote (Concern for the Dead 12.15) of the man who died and went to heaven only to be sent back because the celestial officials had the right name but wrong person--thereby anticipating the Hollywood movie Heaven Can Wait.
Moten places such performances in dialogue with an exhaustive collection of Western philosophers and theorists, including Sigmund Freud, who in chapter one helps Moten to think through the question of "drive" in Ellington's music; Martin Heidegger, whom Moten fruitfully relates to LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka in chapter two, the book's longest and most ambitious chapter; and Jacques Derrida, whose theory of "invagination" suffuses Moten's text as a whole but seems most productive when related to his readings of Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and, later, the work of black philosopher and conceptual artist Adrian Piper.
Confidence suffuses the grooves of Ani DiFranco's crackling Evolve.