sudden deafness


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sudden deafness

a profound sensory hearing loss that develops in 24 hours or less; generally thought to be due to a viral infection in the inner ear.
See also: idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing impairment.

sudden deafness

Audiology An abrupt hearing loss that follows a known cause of deafness–eg, an explosion, viral infection, or use of certain drugs

sud·den deaf·ness

(sŭd'ĕn def'nĕs)
A profound sensory hearing loss that develops in 24 hours or less; generally thought to be due to a viral infection in the inner ear.

sudden deafness

Deafness that occurs after an acute insult to the ear, e.g., after exposure to a toxin or medication (as from too high a dose of aminoglycosides), after a viral infection that damages the inner ear, or after blasts or head trauma.
See also: deafness
References in periodicals archive ?
Statistics in the literature show sudden deafness, tinnitus, inner ear damage, and Meniere disease to be predominant in the left ear (10 to 20%).
In a meta-analysis of 17 studies (3,219 patients) exploring sudden deafness, Reiss found a distribution of 43.
Though there are more than 100 possible causes of sudden deafness, it is rare for a specific cause to be precisely identified.
By definition, the causes of idiopathic sudden deafness are less certain.
The management of idiopathic sudden deafness begins after we have ruled out known causes by magnetic resonance imaging and other means.
The latter finding is consistent with earlier reports that vertigo is associated with a negative prognosis in patients with hydropic hearing impairment (32) and sudden deafness.
Personal experiences with tympanoscopy in sudden deafness [in German].
0%) who had been treated beyond 1 week of the onset of sudden deafness experienced no recovery, a rate that is consistent with the failure rate of 53% reported by Shaia and Sheehy.
Diagnostic criteria for sudden deafness, mumps deafness and perilymphatic fistula.
Serological and clinical study of herpes simplex virus infection in patients with sudden deafness.
In the 54 patients with contralateral DEH, the presumed causes of hearing loss were upper respiratory tract infection with high fever in seven, otitis media and mastoiditis in five, mumps in five, head injury in five, sudden deafness in four, measles in two, acoustic trauma (by firecrackers) in one, and meningitis in one (table 2).