suctorial


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suctorial

 [suk-tor´e-al]
adapted for sucking.

suc·to·ri·al

(sŭk-tō'rē-ăl),
Relating to suction, or the act of sucking; adapted for sucking.

suctorial

/suc·to·ri·al/ (suk-tor´e-al) adapted for sucking.

suctorial

(sŭk-tôr′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Adapted for sucking or clinging by suction: a suctorial organ.
2. Having organs or parts adapted for sucking or clinging.

suc·to·ri·al

(sŭk-tōr'ē-ăl)
Relating to suction, or the act of sucking; adapted for sucking.

suctorial

adapted for sucking.
References in periodicals archive ?
On both specimens, the anus was located closer to the edge of the suctorial disk than the origin of the anal fin.
The specimen had dark mottled coloration, multiple rows of teeth in the lower mandible, and an anus closer to the edge of the suctorial disk than the origin of the anal fin.
Suctorial shield concave antero- medially, 42 long, 49 wide, I pair anterior suckers, I pair anal suckers, 2 pairs each of lateral and posterior suckers (Fig.
The suctorial organ of the Solifugae (Arachnida, Solifugae).
Coxal field III closed; genital disc (gdi3) and suctorial shield without radial striation.
Suctorial shield 55 long, 76 wide, slightly concave antero- medially, broadly rounded posteriorly, dotted, 1pair anterior suckers, 1pair anal suckers, both equal in size having dots in between, 1pair lateral and 1pair posterior suckers.
Because members of the Pulmonata as well as most of the outgroup taxa do not have a uniserial radula, which was acquired for suctorial feeding, this character state would be one of the synapomorphies of the Sacoglossa (including Cylindrobulla).
Suctorial feeding and kleptoplasty can be treated as synapomorphies of the clade of the Sacoglossa.
Suctorial shield concave antero-medially, rounded posteriorly, 42 (47-49) long, 54 (49-56) wide (Fig.
falki suctorial shield is without radial striations while in this new species suctorial shield in with radial striations.
Three principal feeding patterns have been described for nemerteans, namely suctorial feeding, macrophagous feeding, and suspension feeding (McDermott and Roe, 1985).