suctioning


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suctioning

 [suk´shun-ing]
removal of material through the use of negative pressure, as in suctioning an operative wound during and after surgery to remove exudates, or suctioning of the respiratory passages to remove secretions that the patient cannot remove by coughing. Suctioning of the nose and mouth is a relatively simple procedure requiring only cleanliness and sensible care in the removal of liquids obstructing the nasal and oral passages. Suctioning of the deeper respiratory structures (deep or endotracheal suctioning) demands special skill and meticulous care to avoid traumatizing the delicate mucous membranes and introducing infection into the respiratory tree.



Another complication arising from improper tracheal suctioning is hypoxia, which occurs when prolonged suctioning removes the oxygen from the patient's airway and thus adds to existing respiratory distress. The use of a catheter too large in diameter can cause obstruction of the bronchus and subsequent collapse of a lobe of the lung. Because of the potential hazards inherent in the procedure, tracheal suctioning should be reserved only for those patients too weak and debilitated to cough up thick and tenacious sputum. When deep suctioning is necessary, it should be done only by those persons who are skillful in the technique and knowledgeable about the complications that can result from improper use of the suctioning equipment. Guidelines for suctioning patients in either acute care settings or the home have been published by the American Association for Respiratory Care and are available on their web site at http://www.aarc.org.
airway suctioning in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as removal of airway secretions by inserting a suction catheter into the patient's oral airway and/or trachea.

suctioning

The use of suction to remove debris or body fluids from an airway, body cavity, orifice, or surgical site.
See: suction.

suctioning

removal of material through the use of negative pressure, as in suctioning an operative wound during and after surgery to remove exudates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although not fully confirmed, the potential negative effects of open suctioning are often questioned.
In the first 24 hours after birth, the average respiratory rate in the wiping group was 51 breaths/min (standard deviation [SD] [+ or -] 8) vs 50 breaths/min (SD [+ or -] 6) in the suctioning group.
It is not clear whether the deoxygenations that have been reported to occur during suctioning with normal saline instillation were clinically significant.
Suctioning water immediately after a procedure washes away thin films of protein or saliva within the pipes while these films are still fresh and easily water-soluable, before they can dry within the pipes and begin to build up a coating of protein and biofilm.
Subsequently a similar historical-comparison trial in 1988 and a 1992 observational comparison of infants suctioned before or after delivery of the shoulders failed to find any benefit from suctioning before shoulder delivery.
Even in four high-risk subgroups, intrapartum suctioning did not decrease the incidence of meconium aspiration syndrome.
The purpose of this article is to analyze and synthesize the research on saline instillation for suctioning in order to determine the best practice for critically ill patients.
A 14Fr catheter was used to perform the suctioning procedure for 8 seconds.
Macmillan (1995) surveyed nursing and physiotherapy staff regarding reasons for NP suctioning, suctioning practices, and knowledge of adverse effects.
It can be delivered into the canister by suctioning through a suction wand or patient tubing for a closed system, or pouring it through the accessory port.
The product has a soft, flexible tip, thumb port for regulated suctioning and a large bore opening for fast, effective suctioning.
It is designed to have some of the features of the bulb syringe but all the advantages of wall suctioning.