suction drainage


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suc·tion drain·age

closed drainage of a cavity, with a suction apparatus attached to the drainage tube.

suc·tion drain·age

(sŭk'shŭn drān'ăj)
Closed drainage of a cavity, with a suction apparatus attached to the drainage tube.

drainage

(dran'ij)
The flow or withdrawal of fluids, such as blood, infused saline, pus, and collected debris, from a cavity, organ, surgical site, or wound. See: autodrainage; drain

active drainage

Drainage in which negative pressure is maintained in the drainage tube. It is used in treating pneumothorax and in certain types of drains or catheters in the intestinal tract, body cavity, or surgical wound. Synonym: negative pressure drainage; suction drainage. See: Wound Drainage Systems: Negative Pressure

autogenic drainage

A diaphragmatic breathing pattern used by patients with respiratory illnesses (e.g., cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis) to clear the lungs of mucus and other secretions. Various techniques are used, all of which combine positive reinforcement of deep breathing and voluntary cough suppression for as long as possible before evacuating the airways of mucus.

capillary drainage

Drainage by means of capillary attraction.

chest drainage

Placement of a drainage tube in the chest cavity, usually in the pleural space. The tube is used to drain air, fluid, or blood from the pleural space so the compressed and collapsed lung can expand. The tube is connected to a system that produces suction. This helps to remove the material from the pleural space and also prevents air from being sucked into the space.

closed drainage

Drainage of a wound or body space into a self-contained, sealed collecting system.

closed sterile drainage

A sterile tube draining a body site, such as the abdominal cavity or pleural space, that is designed to prevent the entry of air and bacteria into the tubing or the area being drained.

lymphatic drainage

Manual lymphatic drainage.

manual lymphatic drainage

Abbreviation: MLD
Gentle massage techniques used to correct localized lymphedema, e.g., in patients who have swelling of an arm after mastectomy with lymph node dissection. The therapist assists lymphatic flow from the extremity toward the heart. Synonym: lymphatic drainage

negative pressure drainage

Active drainage.

open drainage

Drainage of a wound or body cavity using absorbent materials or catheters that are in contact with the ambient conditions outside the patient.
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior segment of the left upper lobe
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior segment of the right upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: left lingula
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: right middle lobe
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior basal segments of the right and left lung
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior basal segments of the right and left lung
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: left lateral segment of the lower lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: superior segment of the right and left lower lobes

postural drainage

A passive airway clearance technique in which patients are positioned so that gravity will assist the removal of secretions from specific lobes of the lung, bronchi, or lung cavities. It can be used for patients with pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, inhaled foreign bodies, before surgery for lobectomy, or in any patient having difficulty with retained secretions. A side effect of the treatment in some patients is gastroesophageal reflux. See: illustration

Patient care

Physical tolerance to the procedure is evaluated. The respiratory therapist teaches and assists the patient in the procedure, as ordered, by positioning the patient for effective drainage of the affected lung region(s). The patient is encouraged to remove secretions with an effective cough. To decrease the risk of aspiration, the patient should not perform the procedure after meals. Chest vibration and percussion are often performed at the same time to assist movement of retained secretions in the lung.

suction drainage

Active drainage.

through-and-through drainage

Irrigation and drainage of a cavity or an organ such as the bladder by placing two perforated tubes, drains, or catheters in the area. A solution is instilled through one catheter, and the other tube collects the returned fluid actively (by suction) or passively.

tidal drainage

A method, controlled mechanically, of filling the bladder with solution by gravity and periodically emptying the bladder with a catheter. It is usually used when the patient lacks bladder control as in injuries or lesions of the spinal cord.

Wangensteen drainage

See: Wangensteen tube
References in periodicals archive ?
[37] sc Q8 specified specified Author Additional measures Comments Somatostatin Coskun and Suction drainage Yildirim [19] Dietary modifications Ulibarb et Suction drainage al.
Clinical effects of closed suction drainage on wound healing in patients with head and neck cancer.
This fact suggests that suction drainage empties the initial collection (haematoma) better but creates a false impression of complete drainage, and a consequent tendency to remove drains prematurely.
found no significant difference in hospital stay (p=0.7) between low and high pressure suction drainage following axillary clearance17.
[12], negative suction drainage after incision and primary closure of the abscess cavity.
NO WOUND DRAINAGE: When drainage and no drainage were compared in patients who underwent lumpectomy and axillary dissection, [19] short duration closed suction drainage appeared advantageous for decreasing the incidence and degree of seroma formation and did not seem to delay early hospital discharge.
Treatment of auricular haematoma by suction drainage. Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences 1984; 9 (6): 355-60.
In 1991 Matsuura in his clinical analysis of 146 patients summarized that 21 of 146 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax which were treated by Thoracentesis and continuous low negative pressure suction drainage (- 12cm H20) of the pleural space developed REPE, The rate of REPE was higher in patients 20 to 39 years of age than in those over the age of 40.