suction


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suction

 [suk´shun]
1. the drawing of a fluid or solid into a space because the pressure inside it is lower than that outside.
2. aspiration of gas or fluid by mechanical means.
post-tussive suction a sucking sound heard over a lung cavity just after a cough.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

suc·tion

(sŭk'shŭn),
The act or process of sucking.
See also: aspiration (1), aspiration (2).
[L. sugo, pp. suctus, to suck]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

suction

(sŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of sucking.
2. A force that causes a fluid or solid to be drawn into an interior space or to adhere to a surface because of the difference between the external and internal pressures.
tr.v. suc·tioned, suc·tioning, suc·tions
1. To draw away or remove by the force of suction: suction fluid from the lungs.
2. To clean or evacuate (a body cavity, for example) by the force of suction.
adj.
1. Creating suction.
2. Operating or operated by suction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

suction

The removal of a fluid or semifluid substance with a negative pressure device. See Liposuction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

suction

The application of negative pressure so as to withdraw fluid. Suction may be by syringe or mechanical pump and is often applied through a container which acts both as a trap and as a receptacle.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

suc·tion

(sŭk'shŭn)
The act or process of sucking.
[L. sugo, pp. suctus, to suck]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The tension ratcheted up several years ago, when Oregon's neighbor to the south began tightening restrictions on suction dredges - gasoline-powered, raft-mounted vacuums that suck up streambed material and water in search of gold.
Serres is a 42-year-old, leading European manufacturer of suction systems for healthcare professionals.
Testing was conducted with a screen on the suction inlet to keep the ropes, which were simulating tree roots, from entering the suction inlet.
Open mastectomy drains have been shown to be inferior to closed drains and the performance of siphon drains (drains without suction) have been found comparable to that of suction drains23.
It may be prudent for pediatric surgeons and gastroenterologists using this technique to monitor patients' serial hemoglobin following rectal suction biopsy and to be familiar with this rare but real risk of serious bleeding.
The wall shear stress dependence on reaction parameter [lambda] is illustrated in Figure 8 for varying values of the nondimensional time when suction and injection take place.
The suction stress can also be obtained from triaxial shear tests according to Mohr-Coulomb criterion.
Piab's Value Line suction cups in flat-concave, bellows and long-bellows shapes, and with long thin lips are fit for sealing on slightly corrugated surfaces, such as corrugated cardboard, are available globally with off-the-shelf deliveries.
We believe that the risks associated with ET suctioning in these patients may be reduced by lowering the head end of the table by 10[degrees]-15[degrees], performing a gentle chest wall compression and percussion to mobilise secretions, turning the patient's head to the side and then transiently disconnecting the circuit to facilitate passive drainage of oedema fluid without introducing a suction catheter with all the attendant risks of ET suctioning.
Each suction trap in the Midwest Suction Trap Network consisted of an approximately 6 m vertical tube (diameter at top 30.5 cm and bottom 38.0 cm) with an electric fan drawing air at 10 [m.sup.3] per min.