sucrose


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sucrose

 [soo´krōs]
a disaccharide obtained from sugar cane, sugar beet, or other sources; used as a food and sweetening agent.
sucrose hemolysis test a test for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria; the patient's whole blood is mixed with isotonic sucrose solution, which promotes binding of complement to red blood cells, then incubated and examined for hemolysis; greater than 10 per cent hemolysis indicates paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·crose

(sū'krōs),
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, used in pharmacy in the manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose, saccharum
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sucrose

(so͞o′krōs′)
n.
A crystalline disaccharide of fructose and glucose, C12H22O11, extracted chiefly from sugarcane and sugar beets and commonly known as table sugar. Also called saccharose.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
A nonreducing disaccharide made up of d-glucose and d-fructose obtained from sugar cane, Saccharum officinarum (family Gramineae), from several species of sorghum, and from the sugar beet, Beta vulgaris (family Chenopodiaceae); the common sweetener, table sugar, used in the manufacture of syrup and confections.
Synonym(s): saccharose.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sucrose

Cane or beet sugar. A crystalline disaccharide carbohydrate present in many foodstuffs and widely used as a sweetener and preservative. During digestion, sucrose hydrolyses to glucose and fructose.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sucrose

a DISACCHARIDE nonreducing sugar used in sweetening, being obtained from the juice of the sugar cane and from sugar beet. Sucrose (C12H22O11) is formed by a CONDENSATION REACTION between FRUCTOSE and GLUCOSE and can be broken down by acid hydrolysis or incubation with the enzyme sucrase.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

su·crose

(sū'krōs)
Common sweetener, used in pharmacy in manufacture of products such as syrup and confections.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Pooled outcome data for crying duration from 6 studies (5 sucrose, one glucose; 716 injections) showed no significant difference between groups.
The quality indexes of sugarcane juice studied in the paper include the following: (a) sucrose content (Suc); (b) brix (Bx); (c) polarization (Pol); (d) apparent purity (Ap); and (e) gravity purity (Gp).
The highest RS values were obtained for samples treated with partial replacement of sucrose by glucose in the osmotic solution (Treatments T3: sucrose + glucose and T4: sucrose + glucose + Ca[Cl.sub.2]).
In addition, diets containing 15, 30, and 50% sucrose only (Reasol, Iztapalapa, Mexico City, Mexico) were evaluated.
Seeds (~100 mg) were inoculated into 220-mL flasks that contained 40mL of autoclaved (121[degrees]C, 1.1 atm, 15min) 1/2 MS culture medium (MURASHIGE & SKOOG, 1962), 3% sucrose, and 0.7% agar (pH 5.7).
The rate of sucrose accumulation often increases near anthesis in culm internodes, which is a period in which least demand appear in reproductive sinks (Vietor et al., 1989).
In spite of their high degree of accuracy, physical methods can only be used for the titration of pure sucrose solutions.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of sucrose and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) concentrations, as well as plant growth regulators (BAP, KIN and 2iP) in MS medium on in vitro propagation and flowering of Celosia argentea var.
FOS are industrially produced from sucrose by microbial fructosyltransferases derived from several fungi and bacteria (Nemukula, Mutanda, Wilhelmi, & Whiteley, 2009; Prata, Mussatto, Rodrigues, & Teixeira, 2010; Patel & Goyal, 2011; Belghith, Dahecha, Belghithb, & Mejdouba, 2012; Chen, Sheu, & Duan, 2014; Ganaie, Rawatb, Wania, Gupta, & Kango,2014).
The team found that dietary fructose and sucrose increased 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) signaling, which increased production of 12-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) to raise the risk of breast cancer development and metastasis.