sucralfate


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sucralfate

 [soo-kral´fāt]
a complex of aluminum and a sulfated polysaccharide, used as a gastrointestinal antiulcerative and gastric mucosa protectant; administered orally.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·cral·fate

(sū-kral'fāt),
Sucrose octakis (hydrogen sulfate) aluminum complex; a polysaccharide with antipeptic activity, used to treat duodenal ulcers by providing a protective coating to allow healing.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sucralfate

(so͞o-krăl′fāt′)
n.
A drug, C12H54Al16O75S8, that binds to gastric acid and is composed of a sulfated polysaccharide and aluminum complex, used to treat duodenal ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sucralfate

A complex of sucrose sulfate and AlOH, used to prevent acute gastric injury, ↓ inflammation, heal peptic ulcers Side effects Constipation, dry mouth, N&V, headache, urticaria, rashes
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sucralfate

A drug that forms a protective coating over the stomach or duodenal lining. Sucralfate is used in the treatment of peptic ulceration. A brand name is Antepsin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

su·cral·fate

(sū-kral'fāt)
Sucrose octakis (hydrogen sulfate) aluminum complex; a polysaccharide with antipeptic activity, used to treat duodenal ulcers.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Prescription of sucralfate in patients after tonsillectomy resulted in alleviation of post-operative odynophagia.
granatum fruits and its chloroform fraction ([Fr-CHCl.sub.3]), omeprazole (Omz) (10 mg/kg) and sucralfate (SUC) (500 mg/kg) were prepared in 1% carbox-ymethyl cellulose (CMC) as suspension and administered orally 45 mins prior to exposure of ulcerogens to the animals at a volume of 1 ml/200 g of body weight.
Sucralfate at 250 mg/kg was used as a positive control in these experiments.
If antibiotic therapy is not used, then antisecretory therapy or sucralfate should be initiated.
Sucralfate is administered 1 g every 4 or 6 hours to prevent GI bleeding.