suckle


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suck·le

(sŭk'ĕl),
1. To nurse; to feed by milk from the breast.
2. To suck; to draw sustenance from the breast.

suckle

(sŭk′əl)
v. suck·led, suck·ling, suck·les
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause or allow to take milk at the breast or udder; nurse.
b. To take milk at the breast or udder of.
2. To take in as sustenance; have as nourishment.
3. To nourish as if with the milk of the breast; nurture: "a pagan suckled in a creed outworn" (William Wordsworth).
v.intr.
To suck at the breast or udder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: FIGURE 2: Comparison of onset time for the first piglet to come to the sow's udder to suckle in the treatment group (exposed to AS sounds) and the control group (not exposed to AS sounds) in each lactating period (1-7, 8-14, and 15-21 days after parturition).
Some dogs suckle on their own paws; others use their paws to create a nipple from their bed and suckle on that.
All three enable the vital task of getting the newborn to suckle," Wyatt added.
Six-inch square holes are cut in the sides of the panels next to the bench to allow the calves to reach through and suckle. The goats initially suckle two calves at one time twice a day, and then two goats are used as the calves grow larger.
The study helps to explain why humans, who suckle their babies for up to three years in addition to their nine-month pregnancies, have such a long period of dependency as this is necessary to support the growth of our enormous 1300cc brains.
The tortoiseshell moggy, who has just had a litter of three, even lets Rocky suckle her milk alongside her kittens.
A Melbourne court heard the boy had complained his Fijian mother had hit him with a belt and wanted him to suckle her breasts during a visit with her last year.
Put lambs into group pens and take them to the teats on the ad lib bucket or machine to teach them to suckle. You may need to repeat several times in the first day to ensure lambs are confident drinkers.
In addition to good nutrition of the ewe through pregnancy, lamb vitality and mothering ability play an important role in influencing the success with which lambs suckle after birth.
Straus and his colleagues suspect the habit has been adapted to a new use - helping mammals learn to suckle.
Loving Daisy, the eight hundred-weight Charolais, lets him suckle milk alongside her calf.
And when the cute kitty feels a bit peckish, he even suckles from his adoptive parent pooch.