suck

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suck

(sŭk),
1. To draw a fluid through a tube by exhausting the air in front.
2. To draw a fluid into the mouth; specifically, to draw milk from the breast.
[A.S. sūcan]

suck

[AS. sucan, to suck]
1. To draw fluid into the mouth, as from the breast.
2. To exhaust air from a tube and thus draw fluid from a container.
3. That which is drawn into the mouth by sucking.

Patient discussion about suck

Q. What does thumb or finger sucking mean in ADULTS? People watch the unusual behavior of a person and decide their disorder. I strongly agree, but here is a critical question for you all. What does thumb or finger sucking mean in ADULTS?

A. It’s not a show to enjoy and laugh! It means that whomever you are talking about needs to see a psychologist. I am not joking. Things we are supposed to out-grow but don't, i.e. thumb sucking, imaginary friends or bed wetting, can represent serious problems or mental blocks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_OVYDwwAu4&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vB%5EOVYDwwAu4_health_posture_1953?q=sucking&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about suck
References in periodicals archive ?
The border collie was sucked through a pipe of fast-flowing water and was lucky to survive Chris Booth
Mark said: "When he got sucked through, the force of him hitting her unsnagged her."
Remember they sucked so they were going to get a lot of hate whether they asked for it or not.
Her hair had been sucked into the drain, the same thing that led to the deaths of a girl in Fukushima Prefecture and another in Fukuoka Prefecture.
Graphic analysis of sucking responses by gender is shown in Figure 2 and demonstrates that males sucked the pacifier at a slightly greater rate under all conditions than did females.
The wind, which forecasters said reached speeds of 91mph, sucked the baby out of its high chair, through a window and into a paddock about 50ft from the house in the town of Fairy Dell.
Phthalates act as softeners, causing the material to become flexible--a desirable characteristic in toys that are chewed or sucked by young children.
The bottom line is: Russia has sucked, sucks, and will suck." The headline writer, too, entered into the spirit of the Jan.
The Institiute examined over 10,950 babies and found that two out of three babies under six months sucked dummies regularly while two in five were given a pacifier at just four weeks.
Thus in describing the birth of his first child, Samuel Sewell reported that "The first Woman the Child sucked was Bridget Davenport." Five days later Sewell wrote that they "First laboured to cause the child suck his mother, which he scarce did at all.
Mark Wright and Michelle Keegan went all Twilight recently when she sucked wasp venom from his bare back.* Ah, young love.
It was found that children whose parents habitually sucked the pacifier were three times less likely to suffer from eczema at 1.5 years of age, as compared with the children of parents who did not do this.