succinylcholine


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succinylcholine

 [suk″sĭ-nil-ko´lēn]
a neuromuscular blocking agent used as the chloride salt to aid in such procedures as endotracheal intubation and endoscopy, as an adjunct to surgical anesthesia, and in convulsive therapy; administered intramuscularly or intravenously.

suc·ci·nyl·cho·line

(sŭk'si-nil-kō'lēn),
A neuromuscular relaxant with short duration of action that characteristically first depolarizes the motor endplate (phase I block) but is often later associated with a curarelike, nondepolarizing neuromuscular block (phase II block); used to produce relaxation for tracheal intubation and during surgical anesthesia.

succinylcholine

(sŭk′sə-nĭl-kō′lēn)
n.
A crystalline compound, C14H30N2O4, formed by esterification of succinic acid with choline and used medically to produce brief but complete muscular relaxation during surgical anesthesia.

succinylcholine

Anesthesiology A potent, rapid depolarizing muscle relaxant that provides short-term paralysis for tracheal intubation during surgery, attenuating motor activity of seizures evoked by electroconvulsive therapy Complications Postoperative myalgia, transient ↑ in serum K+, ↑ in intraocular, intracranial, and intragastric pressure; malignant hyperthermia. See Cholinesterase, Dibucaine number, Depolarizing agent, Muscle relaxant.

suc·ci·nyl·cho·line

(sŭk'si-nil-kō'lēn)
A neuromuscular relaxant with short duration of action that characteristically first depolarizes the motor endplate (phase I block) but is often later associated with a curarelike, nondepolarizing neuromuscular block (phase II block); used to produce relaxation for tracheal intubation and during surgical anesthesia.

suc·ci·nyl·cho·line

(sŭk'si-nil-kō'lēn)
A neuromuscular relaxant with short duration of action that characteristically first depolarizes the motor endplate (phase I block) but is often later associated with a curarelike, nondepolarizing neuromuscular block (phase II block).
References in periodicals archive ?
Fasciculations induced by succinylcholine could increase the incidence of sore throat.
Fang, "Effects of different dosage of dextomidine on the intraocular pressure changes after succinylcholine administration and endotracheal intubation," Journal of Clinical Anesthesiology, vol.
The plasma enzyme pseudocholinesterase is produced in the liver and functions to metabolize ester linkages of compounds in the plasma including succinylcholine, ester local anesthetics, and other medications.
Rhabdomyolysis after succinylcholine administration [letter; in Spanish], Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim 2005;52(3): 184-5.
In 1975, Savarese and colleagues published on the role of TOF ratio in prolonged neuromuscular block with succinylcholine (21).
Pre-treatment with diclofenac [1], ketorolac [2], calcium [3], diazepam [4], lignocaine [5], magnesium [6], small dose of succinylcholine as self-taming [7], atracurium [8], rocuronium [9], cisatracurium [10], remifentanyl [11], gabapentin [12], d-tubocurare [13], pancuronium [14], vecuronium [15] etc.
Myth: Atropine should be administered before succinylcholine for neonatal and pediatric intubation.
* If the abovementioned measures are ineffective, more aggressive pharmacological therapy is needed (succinylcholine, rocuronium--if there is a contraindication to succinylcholine's use and no difficult airway is anticipated, use propofol etc.).
A 1-mg dose of vecuronium followed by 120 mg of succinylcholine was administered to induce paralysis and facilitate endotracheal intubation.
Among the drugs Fox found that were in short supply during 2011 were injectable versions of calcium gluconate, used by first responders to regulate heart rhythm in patients suffering cardiac arrest; succinylcholine, a muscle relaxer used to intubate patients; naloxone hydrochloride, which reverses drug overdoses; and propofol, an anesthetic used in emergency surgery better known for causing the death of singer Michael Jackson.
When he asked for the: next best drug, it wasn't available either because supply had been depleted from the succinylcholine shortage.
Succinylcholine is a fast-acting muscle relaxant typically used when seconds count, for instance, when intubating trauma patients.