subvocalize

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subvocalize

(sŭb-vō′kə-līz′)
tr. & intr.v. subvocal·ized, subvocal·izing, subvocal·izes
To articulate or engage in articulation by moving the lips or other speech organs without making audible sounds, as in reading to oneself.

sub·vo′cal·i·za′tion (-kə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
sub·vo′cal·iz′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, although earlier results using both positive and negative sentence stimuli (Havas et al., 2007) were consistent with an embodied account rather than subvocalization process, no study has thus far differentiated between these two accounts on a more global discourse level.
Thus, the normal developmental process of reading silently progressed from vocalization to subvocalization.
Memory processes mediated by subvocalizations were also analyzed by considering the stimulus modality (auditory vs.
In addition, during sessions when all students are sitting at the table together, the students use subvocalization for the extra motor practice when it is not their turn.
If children were not observed counting but stated that they counted (subvocalization), they were coded as having used the verbal counting strategy.
Is the immediate memory span determined by subvocalization rate?
These propositions readily and quite convincingly support the belief that "rhetorical" punctuation mainly comprised directives for public speaking, reading aloud, stage performance, or (at a minimum) the subvocalization of texts in the process of reading.
A "mental" performance involves a largely spontaneous subvocalization of the text, thus a (partial) instantiation of the sound patterns of the text.
In terms of Baddeley's working memory model, rate of subvocalization rather than overt rehearsal is considered the crucial determinant of memory capacity; therefore, silent rehearsal would seem the most precise measure of speed of subvocalization.
Hogan also raises interesting questions about the parameters of subvocalization, rehearsal memory, actual line length, and typological differences between oral and written composition, observing that non-European literary theory is especially helpful in isolating literary universals.
One method of investigating its role is to examine how reading is affected by interfering with subvocalization. A common technique for this is to use articulatory suppression.