subtraction

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subtraction

 [sub-trak´shun]
the photographic or electronic removal of overlying structures from radiologic images.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sub·trac·tion

(sŭb-trak'shŭn),
A technique used to enhance detectability of opacified anatomic structures on radiographic or scintigraphic images; a negative of an image made before introduction of contrast medium or radionuclide is photographically or electronically removed from a later image; commonly used in cerebral angiography.
See also: digital subtraction angiography, mask.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sub·trac·tion

(sŭb-trak'shŭn)
A technique used to enhance detectability of opacified anatomic structures on radiographic or scintigraphic images; a negative of an image made before introduction of contrast medium or radionuclide is photographically or electronically removed from a later image; commonly used in cerebral angiography.
See also: digital subtraction angiography, mask
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

subtraction

(sŭb-trak′shŏn)
Removal of undesired overlying structures from a radiographical image by superimposing an image taken before the addition of contrast material with one taken after.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
To Insure Perfect Solutions Minuend minus Subtrahend equals Difference or Minuend - Subtrahend Difference TIPS ...
This could be accomplished by creating a new Gain Basis, utilized solely as the subtrahend in the computation of gain from the disposition of depreciable property.
We addressed the 200 NCs with addends and subtrahends from 0 to 9.
Neither Jane nor Emma was successful in completing the subtraction examples, when employing wholistic, because of lack of understanding of the effect of changing the subtrahend. In contrast, Sarah was successful, with scaffolding.
One of the most common errors students make with number operations relate to the subtraction of one number from the other where one of the digits in the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding digit in the minuend (see Young & Shea, 1981).
This rule, however, does not help teachers understand the changes made to the minuend or the subtrahend. It is important to address erroneous applications of rules that are not well understood and to carefully consider justifications for why proce dures work.
To solve the same problem, 34 -- 18, using equal addition, an equivalent problem is created by adding the same number to the minuend and subtrahend. Ten 1's are added to the minuend, and one group of 10 is added to the subtrahend:
To compensate, 1 ten is added to the subtrahend, resulting in 8 tens.
[Although this student was decomposing the subtrahend in his methodology, his explanation was valid.]
For subtraction, one child holds the subtrahend, one child holds the difference, and the teacher calls out the minuend.
This process does not necessarily mean that they perform an algorithmic check, such as adding the difference to the subtrahend to be sure that the sum is the minuend.
In this next vignette, Jackie, a third grader who had already had experiences with subtraction, used an abstraction of the meaning of the minuend and subtrahend to create her own method of subtracting quantities.