subtle

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subtle

 [sut´'l]
1. very fine, as a subtle powder.
2. very acute, as a subtle pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The range features delicate shades of olive, gold, taupe and nude pinks which illuminate the face and eyes for a subtly natural and youthful look (pictured above).
A second regression analysis for the subtly promiscuous male vignette had no significant predictor.
The result, both subtly erotic and intensely intimate, virtually screams for a Privacy, please sign!
The similarities between the alternating stories are subtly and delicately drawn, rich in detail and nuance.
At the same time, his connection of past to present, woven more subtly into the rest of the book, reminds us once again that those who forget the past, as the saying goes, are doomed to repeat it.--Bryan Cones
Commissioned by the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, a major government agency, KPF's aim was to reconnect this rapidly evolving area with the historic core and explore, albeit subtly, some of the formal and ornamental themes of traditional Islamic architecture.
The spectrum of the pMBA's infrared emissions changes subtly in response to the pH of the surrounding fluid.
The whole aircraft is equipped with mood lighting, which adjusts subtly to the time of day benefiting all in the cabin.
A scheme of buttons and zippers reflected in both wall hardware details and flooring materials subtly reinforces the clothing message, while a range of lighting solutions supports all of the kinds of activities required, says Dale Greenwald, Design Director for Cannon Design in New York City.
The media training I provide to our executive team includes advising them, when asked a question, to answer it as directly and succinctly as possible--and then subtly segue into one of our key messages.
Robijns subtly displaces, alters, and replicates everyday objects and builds extensive spatial installations, often incorporating sound or projected images.
In both cases, pastors claim to be organizing around an issue--in this case opposition to same-sex marriage--while subtly (or not-so-subtly in some cases) promoting a candidate for public office.