subsyndromal

subsyndromal

(sub″sĭn-drō′măl)
1. Subthreshold.
2. Having a cluster of symptoms suggesting a particular disease or condition but that do not meet the defined criteria used to make a diagnosis of that disease or condition.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As such, they have lower rates of subsyndromal depression, dysthymia, major depression, and anxiety disorders (Carstensen, Fung, & Charles, 2003; Sims, Hogan, & Carstensen, 2015).
1% for subsyndromal but dysfunctional manic symptoms.
Psychosocial interventions with art, music, tai-chi and mindfulness for subsyndromal depression and anxiety in older adults: a naturalistic study in Singapore.
Posttraumatic stress disorder was measured using the Structured Clinical Interview for Axis I Disorders, and patients were included if they resulted in either diagnosable or subsyndromal PTSD.
Several clinical variables are associated with poor functioning in patients with bipolar disorders including number of episodes, (5) persistent subsyndromal symptoms, (6) prior number of psychiatric hospitalisations, (7) co-morbid substance use disorder, (8,9) side-effects of medicine, history of psychotic symptoms, (4,10) early age at onset, (4,11) longer duration of mood episodes, (12) and low premorbid functioning.
Trying to analyze the risk at different levels, subsyndromal MetS 1 (SMetSl) was used to label those having abnormal levels in any one of the parameters.
The DSM-5 categories of unspecified anxiety and depression were used to categorise subsyndromal but clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively.
Longitudinal studies have revealed that subsyndromal hypomanic and depressive symptoms continue their existence even in remission (5,6).
In a study of people with subsyndromal SAD, investigators randomized 48 participants to bright white fluorescent light or narrow-band blue light (peak LED wavelength, 470 nm).
Therefore, for a period of time between the 1980 publication of the DSM-III and the DSM-5, "real-world" presentations of subsyndromal, opposite-pole symptoms that are common in major depressive disorder (MDD) and in bipolar disorder were not accounted for.