substrate

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substrate

 [sub´strāt]
1. any substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

sub·strate (S),

(sŭb'strāt),
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (for example, the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

/sub·strate/ (sub´strāt)
1. a substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

substrate

(sŭb′strāt′)
n.
1. The material or substance on which an enzyme acts.
2. Biology A surface on which an organism grows or is attached.
3. An underlying layer; a substratum.

substrate

[sub′strāt]
Etymology: L, sub + stratum, layer
a chemical acted on and changed by an enzyme in a chemical reaction.

substrate

Psychiatry The mental and/or emotional basis on which a particular response occurs. See Suicide substrate.

sub·strate

(S) (sŭb'strāt)
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. The base on which an organism lives or grows, e.g., the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture.
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

The substance on which an ENZYME acts. Any reactant in a reaction that is catalyzed by an enzyme.

substrate

  1. the medium on which an organism (especially a microorganism) can grow.
  2. the solid object to which a plant is attached, such as a rock forming the substrate for a seaweed STIPE.
  3. any substance on which an enzyme can act.

substrate

substance acted on/changed by enzyme action

sub·strate

(sŭb'strāt)
1. Substance acted on and changed by an enzyme.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (e.g., substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

any substance upon which an enzyme acts.

substrate binding site
part of the active site of an enzyme which includes the amino acid residues that come into contact with the substrate.
substrate specificity
range of substrates that can be catalytically converted to product by an enzyme.
suicide substrate
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, international scholars have developed methods for using coconut husks as a main material in organic substrates.
After seedling emergence, up to 5 cm of the 5 substrates listed above, were gradually added to a bed according to the plot plan of the experimental design, and for the function of hilling the beds as the plants grew.
Many companies are able to design the substrate using prepreg materials and avoid use of more expensive buildup substrates, but as package roadmaps increasingly show finer bump pitch, greater use of buildup substrates is anticipated.
While surface preparation is paramount, even a perfectly prepared substrate can result in adhesion failure.
It is worth noting that mushrooms harvested from cased substrates had higher moisture content.
Replacing large, bulky connectors with patterning interconnects that have fine-pitch edge mounted units greatly reduces substrate size.
The various types can be applied to the metal substrate using a chemical bath in an electrolytic or electroless process (with or without anodes), or via vacuum chamber using physical vapor deposition (PVD), chemical vapor deposition (CVD), or plasma-assisted CVD (PACVD).
For example, the devices need to be formed on film substrates such as plastics, because the products to which the devices are attached have various shapes, and in addition they are often distributive ones.
Vacuum-deposited Parylene film can improve the surface properties of rubber substrates in ways that cannot be achieved with other materials or processes.
Aromatic substrates and metabolites were monitored in all reactors amended with 3-CB and/or 2-CP.
Even so, it proved possible in the 1970s to breed white leghorns free of endogenous ALV genomes; such chickens are now being introduced by Merck as preferred substrates for vaccine production.
Surface kinetics control usually allows for coatings of uniform thicknesses on substrates that are complicated in shape.