substrate


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substrate

 [sub´strāt]
1. any substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

sub·strate (S),

(sŭb'strāt),
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (for example, the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

/sub·strate/ (sub´strāt)
1. a substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

substrate

(sŭb′strāt′)
n.
1. The material or substance on which an enzyme acts.
2. Biology A surface on which an organism grows or is attached.
3. An underlying layer; a substratum.

substrate

[sub′strāt]
Etymology: L, sub + stratum, layer
a chemical acted on and changed by an enzyme in a chemical reaction.

substrate

Psychiatry The mental and/or emotional basis on which a particular response occurs. See Suicide substrate.

sub·strate

(S) (sŭb'strāt)
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. The base on which an organism lives or grows, e.g., the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture.
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

The substance on which an ENZYME acts. Any reactant in a reaction that is catalyzed by an enzyme.

substrate

  1. the medium on which an organism (especially a microorganism) can grow.
  2. the solid object to which a plant is attached, such as a rock forming the substrate for a seaweed STIPE.
  3. any substance on which an enzyme can act.

substrate

substance acted on/changed by enzyme action

sub·strate

(sŭb'strāt)
1. Substance acted on and changed by an enzyme.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (e.g., substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

any substance upon which an enzyme acts.

substrate binding site
part of the active site of an enzyme which includes the amino acid residues that come into contact with the substrate.
substrate specificity
range of substrates that can be catalytically converted to product by an enzyme.
suicide substrate
References in periodicals archive ?
It is expected that in 2015 the IC substrate market will encounter a 7% scale-down to USD 7.
Intel's latest Xeon processors use substrates with five or six buildup layers and have a substrate size of 45 x 42.
This is because of higher mechanical adhesion to porous substrates due to anchoring of the coating to the pores of the substrate.
Embedding capacitance material into the structure of the substrate minimizes the requirement for a number of these components, but also increases fabrication complexity and material costs of the substrate.
The major tribulations encountered by mushroom producers are odor emission and nutrient-rich runoff from composting sites during the substrate preparation and disposal phases.
Coating application temperature and layer thickness are also issues, as higher deposit temperature or a build-up of coating material can affect substrate dimensions.
The system can planarize ITO films and metal films on an uneven substrate surface, and wash fine foreign substances.
Parylene coating establishes a barrier (figure 1) that can prevent the transfer of substances into or out of the coated substrate, even when the film layer is only one to two microns in thickness.
No-substrate controls (2 L) were maintained for each experiment and did not receive any chlorinated substrate additions.
The raw data from the measurement includes the effect of the substrate material and the interfacial thermal resistances between the sensor plates and the specimen.
Until now, the only method to reliably align the molecules involved rubbing a polymer substrate with a velvet cloth.
The degree of contamination is affected by a number of factors, including contact between the head and recording medium and the nature and durability of the substrate.