substrate


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substrate

 [sub´strāt]
1. any substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

sub·strate (S),

(sŭb'strāt),
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (for example, the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

/sub·strate/ (sub´strāt)
1. a substance upon which an enzyme acts.
2. a neutral substance containing a nutrient solution.
3. a surface upon which a different material is deposited or adhered, usually in a coating or layer.

substrate

(sŭb′strāt′)
n.
1. The material or substance on which an enzyme acts.
2. Biology A surface on which an organism grows or is attached.
3. An underlying layer; a substratum.

substrate

[sub′strāt]
Etymology: L, sub + stratum, layer
a chemical acted on and changed by an enzyme in a chemical reaction.

substrate

Psychiatry The mental and/or emotional basis on which a particular response occurs. See Suicide substrate.

sub·strate

(S) (sŭb'strāt)
1. The substance acted on and changed by an enzyme; the reactant considered to be attacked in a chemical reaction.
2. The base on which an organism lives or grows, e.g., the substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture.
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

The substance on which an ENZYME acts. Any reactant in a reaction that is catalyzed by an enzyme.

substrate

  1. the medium on which an organism (especially a microorganism) can grow.
  2. the solid object to which a plant is attached, such as a rock forming the substrate for a seaweed STIPE.
  3. any substance on which an enzyme can act.

substrate

substance acted on/changed by enzyme action

sub·strate

(sŭb'strāt)
1. Substance acted on and changed by an enzyme.
2. That on which an organism lives or grows (e.g., substrate on which microorganisms and cells grow in cell culture).
[L. sub-sterno, pp. -stratus, to spread under]

substrate

any substance upon which an enzyme acts.

substrate binding site
part of the active site of an enzyme which includes the amino acid residues that come into contact with the substrate.
substrate specificity
range of substrates that can be catalytically converted to product by an enzyme.
suicide substrate
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the existing coconut husk substrate formulas are coarse and inefficient, and no specific formula exists for use with bitter gourd seedlings.
The effects of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth, yield and post-harvest behavior of TPS seedling tubers were studied by [8, 9] and the significant increase in number of tubers and yield of potato by improving the substrate with addition of farmyard manure was also observed by [7].
Several substrate suppliers have organic interposer capabilities in development, including Ibiden, Kinsus, Kyocera, NTK, Samsung Electro-Mechanics (SEMCO), Shinko Electric and Unimicron.
Although concrete is a porous substrate, penetration is dependent upon its composition, where pore size may limit or prohibit adhesion.
eryngii produced on substrate that is contained in bags or bottles normally yields only one flush before the substrate is discarded.
The substrate must be able to support HDI, which is essential to minimizing size and weight and maximizing performance.
Substrates such as these may come in temporary or prolonged contact with human tissues, and could otherwise be compromised.
Although benzoate was never detected in the 3-CB-amended mesocosm, it was presumably produced via the reductive dehalogenation of the parent substrate and rapidly consumed by Syntrophus species.
Although the adhesion of these coatings to superalloy substrates is of primary importance, the thermal conductivity of the coatings must also be known for design purposes.
The first step in IBM's new method is to deposit a thin layer of diamond-like carbon instead of using a polymer substrate.
May we assume, therefore, that chicken cell substrate vaccines are safe?