substitution

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substitution

 [sub″stĭ-too´shun]
the act of putting one thing in the place of another, such as the chemical replacement of one atom or substituent group by another. Called also replacement.
a defense mechanism in which an individual replaces an unattainable or unacceptable goal, emotion, or motive with one that is attainable or acceptable.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sub·sti·tu·tion

(sŭb'sti-tū'shŭn),
1. In chemistry, replacement of an atom or group in a compound by another atom or group (for example, substitution of H by Cl in CH4 to give CH3Cl).
2. In psychoanalysis, an unconscious defense mechanism by which an unacceptable or unattainable goal, object, or emotion is replaced by one that is more acceptable or attainable; the process is more acute and direct, and less subtle, than sublimation.
[L. substitutio, to put in place of another]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

substitution

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism through which an unattainable or unacceptable goal, emotion, or object is replaced by one that is more attainable or acceptable. See Ego defense mechanism.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sub·sti·tu·tion

(sŭb'sti-tū'shŭn)
1. chemistry The replacement of an atom or group in a compound by another atom or group.
2. psychoanalysis An unconscious defense mechanism by which an unacceptable or unattainable goal, object, or emotion is replaced by one that is more acceptable or attainable; the process is more acute and direct, and less subtle, than sublimation.
[L. substitutio, to put in place of another]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

substitution

  1. a reaction in which an atom or group of atoms is removed and replaced by another atom or group.
  2. the replacement of one amino acid by another.
  3. the replacement of one base by another in a nucleotide or nucleic acid.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

sub·sti·tu·tion

(sŭb'sti-tū'shŭn)
chemistry the replacement of an atom or group in a com pound by another atom or group.
[L. substitutio, to put in place of another]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about substitution

Q. Do people substitute one addiction with another? If someone used to be addicted to alcohol and drugs, but is now clean for several months, is it likely that he will develop an addiction to something else (for example cigarettes or gambling)?

A. I'd just like to add my 2 cents worth: Addictive behavior transfers to just about anything; addiction is the problem. Just as addicts have to learn that alcohol is also a drug, we must recognize that addiction is the problem; it is the behavior that is the problem. A common thing for addicts to do is to stop using drugs (including alcohol) and to substitute with people instead, for example, to become involved in codependent relationships with others, or to recognize that their ongoing relationships may also be codependent. It's not uncommon for individuals to go to CoDA (Codependents Anonymous) in addition to AA/NA or GA(Gambler's Anonymous), MA (Marijuana Anonymous)...Others find it more beneficial to use one program (like NA, e.g.), while realizing that addiction refers to more than just a drug or substance.

Q. Any suggestions for coping with asthma in 5 year old? My daughter has asthma. It comes on when she has a cold or an ear or throat infection. I had to give her a liquid steroid last night as she had asthma really badly, the trouble is the steroid makes her so hyper-active, jumping off lounges and running around etc. It drives me crazy because she really needs to rest. I have seen specialists and this is what they all prescribe. What sort of medications do you give your asthmatic child? Are there any new developments I'm not aware of? I would really like some natural remedies if there is any, or diet tips.

A. hi whiteh,i am a retired respiratory therapist,depending on how bad your child is with her attacks will determine what types of meds work for her steroids are given for bad asthma an it might be the only thing that works good for her,her dr knows best.if your child has a regular dr. get a pulmonary specialist for her.----also steroids should NOT BE STOPPED right AWAY if your child has been on high doses this can cause her to have a bad attack.---mrfoot56

More discussions about substitution
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Part VI explores one significant implication of recognising the distinction between substitutionary and compensatory contractual money awards that was of particular relevance in Clark v Macourt: the status of the so-called 'avoided loss rule of mitigation.
The Son must also voluntarily take on this task, exercising his own free will to offer himself as a substitutionary sacrifice which satisfies divine justice.
Mohler also gave some context on why penal substitutionary atonement matters to Southern Baptists.
In my view, by holding on to some form of a substitutionary expiation theory that deals with universal sin and divine justice in combination with divine love, Girard's theory deserves a place under the atonement theory tent.
Certain understandings of objectivity tend to think of epistemic authority only in the substitutionary role.
But, what exactly happens in this substitutionary atonement rightly remains open to theological explanation.
Most econometric and demographic studies tend to indicate that skill sets possessed by undocumented immigrants in our heterogeneous labor market are more complementary than substitutionary.
When litigation complements existing regulatory policy, an increase in transnational litigation may have a substitutionary effect.
Grappling at length with the rigorous sacrificial system detailed in Leviticus, Harrell drives home the extent to which Jesus functions as a substitutionary sacrifice in Christianity, although he and his cohorts observe the laws of Leviticus haphazardly.
But my main criticism is not that they did too much with the substitutionary and transactional themes in the doctrine of the atonement, but that they did too little.
According to him, the restriction deprives the workers and employees from their right to physically have a vacation or its substitutionary monetary compensation when terminating an employment.
Here, Rossetti recognizes that even Scripture itself exercises Reserve, since it can "darkly" and "negative[ly]" affirm the "Divine Mystery" of the substitutionary atonement, in which Christ, through his death and descent into hell ("making his grave with the wicked"), propitiates the just wrath of God.