substance-related disorder


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substance-related disorder

Any disorder related to drug abuse or the effects of medication. Substances include alcohol, amphetamines, anxiolytics, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, hypnotics, inhalants, methamphetamine, nicotine, opioids, phencyclidine (PCP), and sedatives.
See: abuse, substance; substance dependence disorder; substance-induced disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
This study investigated whether gender-specific prevalence rates differ in terms of counselor diagnoses of certain mood, psychotic, adjustment, childhood, and substance-related disorders, and whether these diagnoses exhibit the same gender-related differences as those reported in the DSM-IV-TR and by researchers who are not counselors = 1,583).
0), those with a substance-related disorder had almost four times the odds (3.
More than one-third of adolescents aged 12-17 have used alcohol or drugs in the past year, with adolescents of Native American, white, Hispanic, and multiple race/ethnic backgrounds most at risk for substance use and substance-related disorders, a study has shown.
For substance-related disorders, there was no statistically significant difference in diagnoses as a function of race, [X.
89% (12 male adolescents, 18 female adolescents) qualified for further assessment for a probable substance-related disorder using the SASSI-A2 validity check.
Individuals with any mental disorder, any substance-related disorder and/or major depressive disorder were more likely to fail to complete secondary education compared with those without the disorders (ORs and 95% CI 1.
Screening instruments for detecting substance-related disorders tend to fall into one of two categories.
For detailed information specifically related to diagnosing substance-related disorders, see Evans, 1998.
Professor Jaap Oosterlaan, principal investigator of the Child Study Group at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and the Emma Childrens Hospital AMC, the Netherlands, said: Now that we have firmly established children with psychiatric disorders as a high-risk group for later substance-related disorders, the next step is to make parents, clinicians, and the government aware of these risks and work together in reducing the risks for addiction and its debilitating consequences.
The authors describe how the majority of psychiatric disorders experienced by adolescents, including mood, anxiety and substance-related disorders, are often linked to a combination of genetic, behavioural and psychosocial factors.
This research attempts to find out difference in use of problem and emotion coping strategies of patients with depressive, anxiety, schizophrenia and substance-related disorders.

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