substance-induced mood disorder


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to substance-induced mood disorder: Manic depressive disorder

substance-induced mood disorder

A prominent and persistent disturbance in mood characterized by either or both of the following: depressed mood or markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities; and elevated, expansive, or irritable mood. The clinical and laboratory findings must support that either the symptoms developed during, or within a month of, substance intoxication or withdrawal, or that the medication (i.e., substance) is causally related to the disturbance. The condition cannot be better accounted for by a mood disorder that is not substance induced. The disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of a delirium. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
See also: mood disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common psychiatric diagnoses were substance-induced mood disorder, followed by substance-induced psychotic disorder.
These deficiencies can lead to anemia, high or low blood glucose levels, decreased ability to produce neurotransmitters in the brain, and subsequent substance-induced mood disorders and other neurological disorders, including Wernicke/Korsakoff syndrome.
Another set of hospitalized patients often not treated for depression are those with substance-induced mood disorders.
For diagnostic purposes, primary mood disorders are divided into 4 major categories: depressive disorders, bipolar disorders, mood disorders due to a general medical condition (eg, depression due to Parkinson's disease), and substance-induced mood disorders (eg, depression due to alcohol abuse).

Full browser ?