substance use prevention


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prevention

 [pre-ven´shun]
the keeping of something (such as an illness or injury) from happening.
fall prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as instituting special precautions with the patient at risk for injury from falling.
pressure ulcer prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prevention of pressure ulcers for a patient at high risk for developing them.
primary prevention the first level of health care, designed to prevent the occurrence of disease and promote health.
religious addiction prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as prevention of a self-imposed controlling religious lifestyle. See also addiction.
secondary prevention the second level of health care, based on the earliest possible identification of disease so that it can be more readily treated or managed and adverse sequelae can be prevented.
shock prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as detecting and treating a patient at risk for impending shock.
sports-injury prevention: youth in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reducing the risk of sport-related injury in young athletes.
substance use prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prevention of an alcoholic or drug use lifestyle. See also substance abuse.
suicide prevention in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reducing risk of self-inflicted harm with intent to end life. See also suicide.
tertiary prevention the third phase or level of health care, concerned with promotion of independent function and prevention of further disease-related deterioration.

substance use prevention

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as prevention of an alcoholic or drug-use lifestyle. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, North Carolina school districts are more likely to be implementing evidence-based substance use prevention curricula at the middle school level, than the elementary or high school levels.
It was expected that social system characteristics (such as urbanicity) would be important, but the only thing that seemed to really matter in the multivariate analysis was the amount of time district SDFS coordinators spent on substance use prevention each week.
The federal SDFSCA has taken several important steps to encourage adoption of effective, evidence-based substance use prevention programs.
Compared to national estimates, (18) districts in this study reported greater use of evidence-based substance use prevention curricula, indicating the extensive use of evidenced-based substance use prevention curricula, while quite low, was not lower than would be expected from a nationally representative sample.
Consistent with earlier findings, the role of the SDFS coordinator is critical in determining whether school districts implement evidence-based substance use prevention curricula.
School district characteristics associated with the adoption of effective substance use prevention curricula.
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