substance dependence


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Related to substance dependence: substance dependence disorder

dependence

 [de-pen´dens]
a need for something; sometimes used as a synonym for drug dependence.
chemical dependence (drug dependence) see drug dependence.
emotional dependence psychological dependence.
physical dependence (physiological dependence) drug dependence in which the drug is used to prevent withdrawal symptoms or in which it is associated with tolerance, or both.
psychoactive substance dependence drug dependence.
psychological dependence drug dependence in which the drug is used to obtain relief from tension or emotional discomfort; called also emotional dependence.
substance dependence drug dependence.

sub·stance de·pen·dence

a pattern of behavioral, physiologic, and cognitive symptoms that develop due to substance use or abuse; usually indicated by tolerance to the effects of the substance and withdrawal symptoms that develop when use of the substance is terminated.

substance dependence

Psychiatry A maladaptive pattern of substance abuse, leading to clinically significant impairment or distress; DSD is formally defined by the DSM-IV as the presence of 3 or more clinical criteria. See Substance abuse.
Substance dependence–3+ of following
1.  Tolerance, either
 a. A need for ↑ amounts, or
 b. ↓ Effect with continued use of same amount of substance
2  Withdrawal symptoms
3.  The substance is taken in larger amounts than intended
4.  A persistent but unsuccessful desire to ↓ substance intake
5.  Much time is spent in activities needed to obtaining the substance or recovering from its effects
6.  Important occupational, social, or recreational activities are sacrificed because of substance use
7.  Continued substance use despite user's knowledge of its adverse physical and/or psychological effects
Modified from *Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Wash, DC, Am Psychiatric Assn, 1994

sub·stance de·pen·dence

(sŭb'stăns dĕ-pen'dĕns)
A pattern of behavioral, physiologic, and cognitive symptoms due to substance use or abuse; usually indicated by tolerance to the effects of the substance and withdrawal symptoms when use of the substance is terminated.

sub·stance de·pen·dence

(sŭb'stăns dĕ-pen'dĕns)
Pattern of behavioral, physiologic, and cognitive symptoms that develop due to substance use or abuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The severity of family burden is greatly influenced by the socio-demographic variables of the families as well as the duration of the substance dependence of the cases.
Substance dependence: urine analysis of one hundred and forty four patients.
Another study reported benefits of clozapine in decreasing substance dependence. (7) Several other studies reports in the literature suggest benefits of novel antipsychotics in decreasing substance dependence in patients with a dual diagnosis (i.e.
The dependent variable, moderate-to-high versus low substance dependence probability, was measured with the 67-item Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 (SASSI-3) (Lazowski, Miller, Boye, & Miller, 1998).
Addiction has typically been used interchangeably with substance dependence; however, with the proposed changes in the DSM V hopefully, this controversy will be removed.
Formerly, Substance dependence was treated as a genetic problem.
Advanced provider skill is required to determine their chief complaint (usually apart from issues of substance dependence) and other "relevant aspects of their clinical presentation in a short time and often with over-taxed resources" (p.
Substance dependence is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.
American Psychiatric Association divides substance use disorders into two categories: substance dependence and substance abuse [5].
Instead of one of four symptoms in the "substance abuse category" and three of seven in the "substance dependence" category found in the 1994 DSM-IV edition, the new criteria for addictive disorders suggest a pattern of use "leading to clinically significant impairment or distress as manifested by two or more of 11 symptoms within a 12-month period.
In 2004, 31.6 percent of parolees reported an unmet need for treatment for substance dependence or abuse.
In the case of substance dependence, seven diagnostic criteria are listed, described in the manual as "a cluster of cognitive, behavioral and physiological symptoms" that indicate that the individual is continuing to use the substance despite harmful effects (American Psychiatric Association, 2000, p.

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