subspecies

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subspecies

 [sub´spe-shēz]
a subdivision of a species; a variety or race.

subspecies

(sŭb′spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. subspecies
A taxonomic subdivision of a species consisting of an interbreeding, usually geographically isolated population of organisms.

sub′spe·cif′ic (-spĭ-sĭf′ĭk) adj.

subspecies

the division of the population of a SPECIES on the grounds of incomplete REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. In many groups of organisms subspecies have been named on minor morphological differences which usually occur in different geographically defined populations. Often, for example in birds, different parts of a CLINE have been given subspecific status; if clines are to be named, only the extremes should have subspecific names. Clearly defined populations such as island forms often merit subspecific names and might be considered as species in the making. see ISOLATING MECHANISMS.
References in periodicals archive ?
parviceps parviceps, implicitly conferring to it subspecific rank.
T# refers to a subspecific taxon rank at the global level.
The major problem to identify species/subspecies in this genus is that their morphs are mimetic, mainly of butterflies in the genus Melinaea Hubner (Nymphalidae: Danainae: Ithomiini) which are phenotypically variable, not only at the subspecific level but also within populations, thus "affecting" their mimics, such as this species of Duvoisvalia (Castniidae).
& MENG, X., 2000.- A molecular marker identifying subspecific populations of the soybean brown stem rot pathogen, Phialophora gregata Ecology and Population Biology, 90: 875-883.
Subspecific status of Argopecten irradians concentricus (Say, 1822) and of the bay scallops of Florida.
From this work, taking into account synonyms and nomenclatural changes but excluding the accepted subspecific taxa, one can derive another list of the sedges known and reported to occur in Illinois, including 17 genera and 225 species, 138 of which were species of Carex.
Hoffmann examined the specimens and made the subspecific determinations.
The so-called specific boundaries between the bovines have proven to be nothing more than subspecific, in most cases.