subspecies

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subspecies

 [sub´spe-shēz]
a subdivision of a species; a variety or race.

subspecies

/sub·spe·cies/ (sub´spe-sēz) a taxonomic category subordinate to a species, differing morphologically from others of the species but capable of interbreeding with them; a variety or race.

subspecies

(sŭb′spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. subspecies
A taxonomic subdivision of a species consisting of an interbreeding, usually geographically isolated population of organisms.

sub′spe·cif′ic (-spĭ-sĭf′ĭk) adj.

subspecies

the division of the population of a SPECIES on the grounds of incomplete REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. In many groups of organisms subspecies have been named on minor morphological differences which usually occur in different geographically defined populations. Often, for example in birds, different parts of a CLINE have been given subspecific status; if clines are to be named, only the extremes should have subspecific names. Clearly defined populations such as island forms often merit subspecific names and might be considered as species in the making. see ISOLATING MECHANISMS.

subspecies,

n an intermediate taxonomical category in biology. Immediately subordinate to species, it usually denotes geographically isolated or morphologically different populations that may interbreed with other subspecies. Abbreviated as
subsp.

subspecies

a subdivision of a species; a variety or race.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the individuals for which subspecific designations were possible, the north-Atlantic (A.
Thus, subspecific and population-specific predictive models of sex identification are critical not only for establishing sex of shrikes in-hand, but also for understanding patterns of geographic variation in sexual dimorphism.
From this work, taking into account synonyms and nomenclatural changes but excluding the accepted subspecific taxa, one can derive another list of the sedges known and reported to occur in Illinois, including 17 genera and 225 species, 138 of which were species of Carex.
The so-called specific boundaries between the bovines have proven to be nothing more than subspecific, in most cases.
If that subspecific designation is accepted, then the A.
As we have suggested in the past (Alix & Scribailo 1998), C values must be assigned to charophytes at the species level, and in some cases the subspecific ranks, if the goal is to improve the effectiveness of the FQA metrics in evaluating lake ecosystems.
They note particularly that many 'forms' of widely distributed species, which differ little if at all in spine, ray and scale counts, show but slight differences in colour pattern between one 'form' occurring in the Western Indian Ocean and another in the Western Pacific and that these too should be accorded specific status in preference to 'form' or subspecific rank.