subspecialty

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subspecialty

(sŭb′spĕsh′əl-tē)
n. pl. subspecial·ties
A narrow field of study or work within a specialty, as pediatric dermatology or geriatric psychiatry.

subspecialty

[-spesh′əltē]
Etymology: L, sub + specialis, individual
(in nursing) a nurse's particular highly specific professional field of practice, such as dialysis, oncology, neurology, or newborn intensive care nursing. Compare specialty.

subspecialty

Medtalk A field of health care expertise requiring 1–2 yrs of post-residency training or fellowship in a recognized program, which often has a closure examination. See Fellowship. Cf Specialty.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are happy to let you know that we are extending this policy to include all other internal medicine subspecialties in the future," ABIM said in a Dec.
Many countries have recognized subspecialties in EM at different times and in different areas.
At present the following are the subspecialties in ophthalmology.
The most frequently visited subspecialties were Ophthalmology/Optometry (5,486 visits; 228 visits per 1,000 subject-years), Orthopedic Surgery (4,009; 167/1,000), Dermatology (3,412; 142/1,000), Otorhinolaryngology (1,847; 77/ 1,000), Allergy/Immunology (1,569; 65/1,000), Neurology (1,129; 47/1,000), and Gastroenterology (1,025; 43/1,000); these seven subspecialties accounted for 76.
Half the children's hospitals said that wait times for seeing pediatricians in the subspecialties experiencing the most severe shortages exceed 2 weeks.
In some subspecialties (neurotology, for example), additional clinical training is required to develop competence in advanced procedures.
Each specialty is subdivided into 4-24 subspecialties (a.
The work relative value units (RVUs) earned by different subspecialties in academic radiology may differ by a large magnitude, according to data supplied by the Association of Administrators in Academic Radiology.
They then address subspecialties and clinical applications of neuraxial anesthesia relative to the type of surgery.
Concerns among healthcare analysts that the majority of pediatricians in training now are women and that this might cause shortages in the future in pediatric subspecialties appear to be almost entirely unfounded, a University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, study concludes.
The top three most popular subspecialties were child and adolescent psychiatry, addiction psychiatry, and forensic psychiatry; all subspecialties had increasing numbers of fellows except for geriatric psychiatry.
Its key priority programs are Women's and Infants' Health, Surgical Subspecialties and Oncology, Internal Medicine and Subspecialties, and the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute.