subspecialize


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subspecialize

(sŭb′spĕsh′ə-līz′)
intr.v. subspecial·ized, subspecial·izing, subspecial·izes
To have or pursue a subspecialty: subspecialize in cosmetic surgery.

sub·spe′cial·ist (-spĕsh′ə-lĭst) n.
sub·spe′cial·i·za′tion (-spĕsh′ə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Physicians subspecialize so that they can provide more medical and surgical expertise for a given population," he said.
Top performers on board examinations likely had the option to subspecialize in higher paying procedural subspecialties of internal medicine (Gray, Park, and Lipner 2010).
There are 2 paths to dermatopathology, one of which is dermatologists who subspecialize.
Most otolaryngologists who subspecialize in one area complete a one or two year fellowship in that area before beginning the subspecialty practice.
The ABEM is a credentialing body for neurologists who subspecialize in peripheral neuromuscular disorders and electrodiagnostic medicine.
These papers have the potential to educate, consolidate our knowledge, and become aides-memoires for those of us who subspecialize in the particular topics covered by individual papers.
She quotes one young physician who plans to subspecialize because of his belief that primary care internists "are in the hospital forever.
A certified specialist in dermatology may subspecialize and become certified for Special Qualification as follows:
Only about 20%-25% of these residents will stay in general internal medicine, while the rest will subspecialize, said Dr.
Only about 20% to 25% of these residents will stay in general internal medicine, while the rest will subspecialize, Dr.
Just as all ophthalmologists train as ophthalmologists and then subspecialize into corneal specialists, cataract specialists, vitreoretinal specialists, or neuro-ophthalmologists, so can psychiatrists and neurologists train in neuropsychiatry and then subspecialize to become epileptologists, psychosis specialists, vascular neurologists/neurointensivists, mood disorders specialists, neuromuscular specialists, anxiety experts, and so on.
These techniques include procedural, surgical, medical, and device therapies based on individual circumstances; and all of these are the purview of conventional cardiologists, especially electrophysiologists who subspecialize in cardiac dysrhythmias.