subspecialize

(redirected from subspecialization)
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Related to subspecialization: subspeciality, subspecialties

subspecialize

(sŭb′spĕsh′ə-līz′)
intr.v. subspecial·ized, subspecial·izing, subspecial·izes
To have or pursue a subspecialty: subspecialize in cosmetic surgery.

sub·spe′cial·ist (-spĕsh′ə-lĭst) n.
sub·spe′cial·i·za′tion (-spĕsh′ə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curricula will include options for development as a leader in practice by collaboration in residencies and through an awareness of specialization and subspecialization.
Specialization in science and even in the humanities is something that's necessary, desirable and keeps going on, with subspecialization and sub-sub-subspecialization and so forth.
The subspecialization becoming prevalent in academic otolaryngology may ultimately alter resident training.
said that further subspecialization could jeopardize the coordination of care between internists and subspecialists.
When the Southern Medical Association was founded in 1906, specialization in American medicine was uncommon and subspecialization was incredibly rare.
Fellowships provide an optional, usually 3-year-long period of training after the completion of residency, for subspecialization.
While Garcia Canclini is becoming widely known in the United States, his fame still does not extend far beyond scholars with a specialization or subspecialization in Latin America.
Today, due in large part to licensure, educational administration is a subspecialization of the sprawling field of leadership and management.
Still further on the continuum, Satin (1994) proposes a "pandisciplinary" model in which geriatrics (or another specialty) could be seen as a distinct, unitary discipline, rather than as a subspecialization across several traditional health care disciplines.
There is no officially designated degree of subspecialization for a NP who wishes to work in the neurosciences.
Such developments have created opportunities to redesign the initial service package and revise customer expectations by reinforcing initial diagnoses with second and third opinions and exploiting subspecialization skills while at the same time, reducing the turn-around time to patient (customer) consultation (Heitoff, 1998).