subspecialize

(redirected from subspecialization)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to subspecialization: subspeciality, subspecialties

subspecialize

(sŭb′spĕsh′ə-līz′)
intr.v. subspecial·ized, subspecial·izing, subspecial·izes
To have or pursue a subspecialty: subspecialize in cosmetic surgery.

sub·spe′cial·ist (-spĕsh′ə-lĭst) n.
sub·spe′cial·i·za′tion (-spĕsh′ə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, pediatric EM is a subspecialization only for pediatricians, but EPs treat nearly half of children with medical problems and more than half of the children with trauma presentations in many EDs (6).
As with everything, subspecialization has both positive and negative effects," said Dr.
Michael Halpern and colleagues, provides strategies that encourage neurology residents' interest in providing MS patient care and pursuing MS subspecialization.
Generalism is the most important attribute needed for primary care, but "what we've created is a system of subspecialization, so at a time when we need a complex skill set to be able to handle problems, we've micro-detailed our physicians into looking at the left kidney," Dr.
Surgeon subspecialization also impacts the success of initial cytoreductive surgery and survival.
Monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte cell surface antigens play an important role in studying lymphocyte differentiation and functional subspecialization.
A high percentage of journal self-citation is quite reasonable when a journal in a category harbors a distinct subspecialization.
Balneoclimatology is studied at Medical School in Belgrade, as one-year subspecialization at the Cathedra for Balneoclimatology.
Third, there is a need for subspecialization in certain areas of chemical pathology, e.
We have 44 SIGs (special interest groups) within our sections, and I believe that we will continue to see an increase in subspecialization within our field, a concept I support.
POL'Y 801, 848, 850 (1994) (finding subspecialization of consumer
The increasing complexity of health care systems and the rise in prevalence of complex illness accompanied by greater fragmentation and subspecialization keeps accelerating and undermines the generalist, holistic capacity of primary care (Stange, 2009).