subscapularis muscle


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Related to subscapularis muscle: Supraspinatus muscle

sub·scap·u·la·ris mus·cle

(sŭb-skap-yū-lar'is mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, subscapular fossa; insertion, lesser tuberosity of humerus; action, rotates arm medially; nerve supply, upper and lower subscapular from posterior cord of brachial plexus (fifth and sixth cervical spinal nerves).
Synonym(s): musculus subscapularis [TA] , subscapular muscle.

subscapularis muscle

Shoulder muscle. Origin: medial subscapular fossa. Insertion: lesser tubercle of humerus. Nerve: upper and lower subscapular (C5-C7). Action: medially rotates arm.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
Releasing the subscapularis muscle was done at the same time on 11 patients except for one who had been operated on at 3 years of age to elevate just the subscapularis muscle.
With the latissimus dorsi lifted, we reach the lateral border of the scapula and the subscapularis muscle is lifted subperiosteally, starting on the lateral and inferior border and continuing towards the medial and superior border with a periosteal elevator.
Subscapularis muscle function and structure after total shoulder replacement with lesser tuberosity osteotomy and repair.
Postoperative subscapularis muscle insufficiency after primary and revision open shoulder stabilization.
The native subscapularis muscle is known to operate in a biphasic manner.
The subscapularis muscle and its glenohumeral ligament-like bands.
The biphasic nature of the subscapularis muscle dictates that:
The angle of resection inferiorly can be checked by visualization through the previously made subscapularis muscle window or using fluoroscopy.
Because of the complexity of the biomechanics of the shoulder, maintaining full external rotation in abduction only will not prevent contracture of the subscapularis muscle.
The lift-off test mainly evaluate the lower subscapularis muscle, while the belly-press assesses the upper muscle belly.
Specifically, the posterior cord innervates the latissimus dorsi, teres major, and subscapularis muscles.
The present authors speculate that the hypertonicity of the biceps, pronator teres and subscapularis muscles can irritate the median nerve and may cause local oedema.