subpoena

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subpoena

[-pē′nə]
Etymology: L, sub + poena, penalty
(in law) a document from a court commanding that a person appear at a certain time and place to testify on a specific matter. Subpoenas are governed by federal rules for criminal and civil procedures.

subpoena

(sŭ-pē′nă)
A court order that requires a person to come to court or appear at a specific time and place to give testimony. Failure to appear can result in punishment by the court.

subpoena (sub´pē´nə),

n the process or writ issued by the court requiring the attendance of a witness at a certain time and place for testimony. It also may order him or her to bring books, records, or other relevant items as evidence.
subpoena duces tecum,
n a subpoena commanding a person to bring books, papers, records, or other items to the court.
References in periodicals archive ?
He allayed the fears of the public that the subpoena power which has been restored by virtue of Republic Act 10973 is anti-poor.
President Rodrigo Duterte signed the new law last week, granting the PNP chief, the director of the PNP Criminal Investigation and Detection Group (CIDG) and the CIDG deputy director subpoena powers.
Consult with expert counsel and/or explain to the judge, if necessary, about the potential conflict between the subpoenas, codes of ethics, and copyright laws.
Taro intends to respond to the subpoena and otherwise cooperate with the Department of Justice investigation," the company said in the filing.
At a press conference, Parker said withdrawing the subpoenas was in the city's best interest.
Grand jury subpoenas often call for the production of important and highly confidential business records including voluminous contracts, emails, project files, address books, and bank and credit card records.
Typically, an attorney or other party will issue a subpoena because you might be in possession of information that will establish facts relevant to the underlying case.
The above hypothetical is a typical situation Article 32 officers are likely to confront, and raises some interesting questions for military justice practitioners as they begin to grapple with issuing subpoenas under their new compulsory process powers.
The New York Credit Union Association of New York strongly backed the measure, which was sponsored by Assemblyman Joseph Lentol (D-Metropolitan) and Senator Stephen Saland (R-Catskill/Hudson) because many credit unions had been "inundated," with subpoenas by law firms and debt collectors, according to William J.
Many an agent and broker has seen subpoenas come and go, with nary a lawsuit being amended to name them in the case.
The bank has received subpoenas regarding municipal derivatives transactions from 1992 to the present.
At least 10 legislators and one former legislator have confirmed personally or through attorneys or the two-year college system that they have received subpoenas.