subpleural


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subpleural

 [sub-ploor´al]
beneath the pleura.

sub·pleu·ral

(sŭb-plū'răl),
Beneath the pleura.

subpleural

/sub·pleu·ral/ (sub-ploor´al) beneath the pleura.

subpleural

beneath the pleura.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in patients with small subpleural lesions, a better diagnostic yield has been reported with an indirect approach that involves a longer intrapulmonary needle path (28, 32).
Macroscopic and microscopic pulmonary findings supporting the diagnosis of SUDEP Macroscopic Evaluation n % Subpleural petechiae 16 14.
Caption: CECT Chest showing Subpleural and Parenchymal Haemorrhagic Metastasis
Chest computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities and subpleural curvilinear shadows in the lower lobes of both lungs (Figure 1b).
10) Computed tomography (CT) of the chest can detect small pneumothoraces as well as reveal pneumatoceles and subpleural blebs secondary to PCP infection; these will appear as thin-walled cystic structures with almost imperceptible walls in the subpleural space and lung parenchyma.
NSIP, the most common pattern of fibrosis seen in DI-ILD, is characterized by basal-predominant subpleural reticular opacities, an absence of honeycombing pattern and scattered ground glass opacities.
5,8) The gradient of negative pleural pressure increases from the lung base to the apex, so that alveoli at the lung apex in tall individuals are subject to significantly greater distending pressure than those at the base of the lung, and the vectors in theory, predispose to the development of apical subpleural blebs.
Thoracic scan results showed cylindrical bronchiectasis and subpleural consolidations in both lungs; culture of a sputum sample obtained on October 22 was positive for N.
Microscopic description: inflamed lung tissue showing nodular collection of lymphocytes and subpleural granulomas with multinucleated giant cells.
The characteristic imaging findings of ELP on high resolution CT chest (HRCT) can be summarized into three major categories: (1) alveolar filling (ground glass pattern) with or without crazy paving, often with subpleural sparing, (2) consolidative pulmonary lesion with spontaneous angiogram sign on unenhanced HRCT (pulmonary vessels may spontaneously be visible within the areas of parenchymal filling without IV contrast), and (3) low-density pulmonary consolidation (-30 to -150 Hounsfield units) in a bronchocentric distribution [16-18].
It is proposed that it is inflammatory in nature, causing newly formed vessels bridging subpleural pulmonary veins and intercostal veins through pleural adhesions [1].
Typical findings of small centrilobular, subpleural nodules, and heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, are highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis [6, 7].